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Enzymes in Drug Discovery Summit

2018-04-232018-01-092017-10-27
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MENTORS
Matthew Bogyo

Matthew Bogyo
Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University
Matthew Bogyo
Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University
 
About Mentor:

Dr. Bogyo is a Professor of Pathology and Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University. He received his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Bates College in 1993 and a doctorate in Chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997. Dr. Bogyo established an independent scientific career as a Faculty Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco in 1998, where he supervised a small laboratory of post-doctoral fellows and students. In 2001, Dr. Bogyo was hired to establish and direct the Chemical Proteomics Department at Celera Genomics focused on applying small molecule probes to the field of drug discovery. Dr. Bogyo then joined the Department of Pathology at Stanford University in July 2003 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2009 and to full professor in 2013. His laboratory works on the development of new chemical probe technologies that are applied to study the role of proteases and hydrolases in complex biological pathways associated with human disease. Dr. Bogyo has published over 200 primary research publications and currently serves on the Editorial Board of several prominent research journals. He was the President of the International Proteolysis Society from 2007-2009 and is the chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Proteolytic Enzymes and Their Inhibitors in 2018 and the Imaging in 2020 meeting in 2016. Dr. Bogyo is also a member of Stanford’s Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) and the ChEM-H Institute at Stanford. He is a consultant for several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in the Bay Area and is the co-founder of Akrotome Imaging, a small start up company developing imaging contrast agents for detection of surgical margins. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Searle Scholar Award, the Terman Fellowship and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in Pathogenesis award.

Yuan Chen

Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
 
About Mentor:

Yuan Chen, Ph.D., is currently Professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope. She obtained B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China, and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Rutgers University. After postdoctoral studies at the Scripps Research Institute, she joined Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope as tenure-track faculty in 1994. Her laboratory has made major contributions in elucidating the mechanism and regulation of the SUMOylation enzymes and discovered the SUMO-interacting motif that mediates most SUMO-dependent cellular functions. Her current research interests center on the mechanism and inhibition of enzymes in ubiquitin-like modifications and the role of ubiquitin-like modifications in major oncogenesis pathways.

Judith Clements

Judith Clements
Distinguished Professor
Queensland University of Technology
Judith Clements
Distinguished Professor
Queensland University of Technology
 
About Mentor:

Judith Clements leads the Kallikrein Protease and Tumour Microenvironment Group Queensland University of Technology (QUT) where the focus of her research is the role of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (the current test for prostate cancer)-related peptidases and their utility as biomarkers or therapeutic targets for prostate and ovarian cancer. In recognition of her contribution to the kallikrein field internationally, she was awarded the prestigious EK Frey Werle Silver & Gold Medals, in 2000 & 2007, respectively. She was also recently elected as a member of the International Proteolysis Society Council for 2014-2017 and to the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences in 2017. She has over 240 publications in scientific journals and collaborates widely with colleagues in the US, Canada, the UK and Europe. She initiated and led the Cancer Program at QUT from 1997-2014. She co-founded, and was Scientific Director (2009-2017), of the Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, at QUT in Brisbane, Australia. She co-founded and directed until 2017 the national prostate cancer tissue bank – the Australian Prostate Cancer BioResource - which is a key resource (>6500 men recruited to date) that underpins prostate cancer research nationally and is co-leader of the Queensland node of the international genome wide association study consortium for prostate cancer, PRACTICAL, that has discovered >140 new genetic regions that are associated with prostate cancer risk. She was awarded the Queensland Women in Technology Biotech Outstanding Achievement Award for 2012, and the prestigious title of Distinguished Professor, the first woman in QUT’s history, in 2013. She was awarded the Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in 2015.

Jose Duca

Jose Duca
Head, Computer-Aided Drug Discovery
Novartis
Jose Duca
Head, Computer-Aided Drug Discovery
Novartis
 
About Mentor:

José is Global Head of Computer Aided Drug Discovery (CADD), part of Global Discovery Chemistry at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR).

José joined Novartis in 2010. Previously, he had been with the Schering-Plough Research Institute and Merck Research Laboratories in Kenilworth, NJ, USA for 10 years where he had increasing responsibilities in the CADD group. His scientific fields of expertise within computational chemistry comprise molecular thinking, modeling, ab initio calculations, molecular recognition, QM-MM methods, solvation and structure-based drug design. José is passionate about drug discovery.

He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the National University of Córdoba, Argentina. He joined Prof. Tony Hopfinger’s group in the College of Pharmacy at the University of Illinois at Chicago as a Postdoctoral Fellow.

Doug Johnson

Doug Johnson
Research Fellow, Chemical Biology
Pfizer
Doug Johnson
Research Fellow, Chemical Biology
Pfizer
 
About Mentor:

Douglas Johnson is a Research Fellow and Head of Chemical Biology at Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development in Cambridge, MA. During his tenure at Pfizer, he has played significant roles on teams that have advanced several clinical candidates including palbociclib (PD 0332991), a CDK4/6 inhibitor approved in 2015 for the treatment of breast cancer; PF-00217830, a D2 partial agonist for schizophrenia; PF-04457845, a FAAH inhibitor for the potential treatment of CNS disorders; and PF-06648671, a γ-secretase modulator for Alzheimer’s Disease. In addition, his group is interested in applying chemical biology methods to enable drug discovery projects. His group has used clickable photoaffinity probes to characterize the targets and the mechanism of action of gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and modulators (GSMs) and the off-target of 1st generation BACE inhibitors responsible for the observed ocular toxicity. Prior to Pfizer, Doug was an NIH postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University in the laboratory of Professor David A. Evans. He obtained his Ph.D. in organic chemistry at The Scripps Research Institute under the guidance of Professor Dale L. Boger and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota with a BS in chemistry.

Bob Lazarus

Bob Lazarus
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
Bob Lazarus
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
 
About Mentor:

Bob Lazarus is a Principal Scientist in the Department of Early Discovery Biochemistry at Genentech, Inc. He joined Genentech in 1983 after receiving his Ph.D. in Chemistry (1979) and carrying out postdoctoral research at Penn State University. He served as the Secretary and then President of the International Proteolysis Society from 2011-2015. Bob has explored protein engineering and mechanistic enzymology projects to investigate molecular, biochemical and biological aspects of protein/protein and protein/ligand interactions. His research areas have included tryptase inhibitors for asthma, HGF/Met receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction implicated in tumorigenesis, metastasis and tissue repair, BACE1 inhibitors for Alzheimer’s disease, the Hedgehog pathway of developmental biology and cancer, molecular diversity scaffolds by phage display, improved versions of DNase I with increased enzymatic activity for CF and other diseases, exosite inhibitors of coagulation Factor VIIa as protease inhibitors and anticoagulants, Kunitz domains as scaffolds for protease inhibition, GPIIb-IIIa integrin antagonists from snake venoms and leeches as platelet aggregation inhibitors and microbial pathway engineering for bioconversion of glucose to vitamin C.