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Enzymes in Drug Discovery Summit

2017-10-232017-11-222017-10-22
EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT! Register by Nov 22, 2017 to receive 20% off your registration!
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PLENARY KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Matthew Bogyo

Matthew Bogyo
Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University
Matthew Bogyo
Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University
 
About Speaker:
Jack Taunton

Jack Taunton
Professor, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California, San Francisco
Jack Taunton
Professor, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California, San Francisco
 
About Speaker:
Epigenetic Enzymes in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Haiching Ma

Haiching Ma
Chief Science Officer
Reaction Biology
Haiching Ma
Chief Science Officer
Reaction Biology
 
About Speaker:
Protease Inhibitors in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Julio A. Camarero

Julio A. Camarero
Professor, Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Southern California School of Pharmacy
Julio A. Camarero
Professor, Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Southern California School of Pharmacy
 
About Speaker:
Doug Johnson

Doug Johnson
Research Fellow, Chemical Biology
Pfizer
Doug Johnson
Research Fellow, Chemical Biology
Pfizer
 
About Speaker:
Maurizio Pellecchia

Maurizio Pellecchia
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
University of California, Riverside
Maurizio Pellecchia
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
University of California, Riverside
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Pellecchia is a chemical biologist with a strong background in pharmaceutical chemistry, biophysics and translational medicine. He trained at the University of Naples (Italy) where he obtained a MS in Organic Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences, at the ETH-Zurich (working with 2002 Nobel Laureate Prof. Dr. Kurt Wüthrich) and the University of Michigan. Prior to his recruitment in 2002 at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research as Associate Professor, he spent a few years in the pharmaceutical industry. He has served on the faculty of the now Sanford Burnham Prebys medical Discovery Institute for 14 years where he also served as the Associate Director for Translational Research for the Institute’s NCI designated Cancer Center.

Since 2015 he is a Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of California at Riverside, School of Medicine and I hold the Daniel Hays endowed Chair in Cancer Research. In addition is the Director of the Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine at UCR. His research is at the forefront of academic drug discovery andchemical biology initiatives. His goals are to support target identification and validation studies in oncology, neurodegenerative, and infectious diseases. The laboratory focuses primarily on the development of innovative pharmacological agents and subsequently apply such agents in target validation studies using cellular and animal models, both internally and via collaborations. Central to these activities are the developing and the application of novel methods and strategies to drug discovery and translational medicine.

Steven Wagner

Steven Wagner
Associate Professor, Neuroscience
University of California San Diego
Steven Wagner
Associate Professor, Neuroscience
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Steven Wagner PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD. He has spent over 25 years in the biopharmaceutical industry, and more recently in academia studying translational neuroscience of age-related neurodegenerative disorders with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). He led the team that discovered the first non-NSAID-like and truly “Notch-sparing” gamma-secretase modulators and introduced the term “gamma-secretase modulators” (GSMs) in 2005 through the discovery of a novel series of diaryl-2-aminothiazole derivatives that are over 5000-fold more potent at lowering A42 levels than the NSAID-like “substrate-targeted” gamma-secretase modulators, e.g., tarenflurbil. His team also, for the first time, purified to homogeneity the gamma-secretase enzyme complex that is ultimately responsible for generating amyloid β(Aβ) plaques, the diagnostic hallmark of AD. Since moving back to academia, into the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD in June of 2009, his laboratory, in addition to designing/discovering another novel and structurally distinct GSM chemotype, was awarded a Blueprint Neurotherapeutics U01 by NIH/NINDS (one of only seven issued in all of Neurology) to optimize and develop GSMs for the treatment and/or prevention of AD. He is also a member of the NIH Drug Discovery SBIR (ETTN-M)ETTN IRG, Division of Neuroscience, Development and Aging Study Section, a member of the NINDS Special Emphasis Panel for the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network, as well as a member of the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) Research Consortium and the Scientific Advisory Board for the Alzheimer’s Association’s Collaboration for Cure (C4C).

Ubiquitin Research and Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Yuan Chen

Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
 
About Speaker:

Yuan Chen, Ph.D., is currently Professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope. She obtained B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China, and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Rutgers University. After postdoctoral studies at the Scripps Research Institute, she joined Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope as tenure-track faculty in 1994. Her laboratory has made major contributions in elucidating the mechanism and regulation of the SUMOylation enzymes and discovered the SUMO-interacting motif that mediates most SUMO-dependent cellular functions. Her current research interests center on the mechanism and inhibition of enzymes in ubiquitin-like modifications and the role of ubiquitin-like modifications in major oncogenesis pathways.

David Hewings

David Hewings
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Genentech
David Hewings
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Genentech
 
About Speaker:
Matthew Petroski

Matthew Petroski
Associate Professor
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Matthew Petroski
Associate Professor
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Matthew Petroski is an Associate Professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla, California, USA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine and did post-doctoral training at Caltech. His research program focuses on ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like protein signaling and their roles in diseases such as cancer.

Ryan Potts

Ryan Potts
Associate Member, Cell & Molecular Biology Department
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Ryan Potts
Associate Member, Cell & Molecular Biology Department
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
 
About Speaker:

Ryan Potts obtained his B.S. in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2000, and his Ph.D. in Cell Regulation from the UT Southwestern Medical Center in 2007. He then did his postdoctoral research at UT Southwestern Medical Center in the Department of Biochemistry as a Sara and Frank McKnight Independent Postdoctoral Fellow (2008-2011). In September 2011, Dr. Potts joined the Department of Physiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center as a tenure-track Assistant Professor. In January 2016, he moved to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as Associate Professor in the department of Cell and Molecular Biology. His scientific interest is in delineating the functions of the MAGE family of E3 ubiquitin ligase regulators.

Steven I. Reed

Steven I. Reed
Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
Steven I. Reed
Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Steven Reed, Ph.D. is Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla. He received an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Stanford University. Dr. Reed carried out postdoctoral research with Nobel laureate Leland Hartwell at the University of Washington and held a faculty position at the University of California, Santa Barbara prior to assuming his current position. He is known for his pioneering work on the roles and regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases in cell cycle control and oncogenesis. More recently he and his wife, Susanna Ekholm-Reed, discovered a novel pathway linking the ubiquitin ligase parkin directly to neuronal survival, leading to identification of a potential therapeutic target for treating Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Reed is a founder of NeuroMantis Pharmaceuticals, a company dedicated to developing therapeutics targeting neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative disease and other pathological conditions.

Domagoj Vucic

Domagoj Vucic
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
Domagoj Vucic
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
 
About Speaker:
Protein Kinases in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Lars Neumann

Lars Neumann
Assays, Biophysics & Screening
Proteros Biostructures
Lars Neumann
Assays, Biophysics & Screening
Proteros Biostructures
 
About Speaker:

2008-current: Head of Assays, Biophysics & Screening at Proteros Biostructures 2005-2008: Group Leader Assay Development & Screening at GPC Biotech 2002-2005: Senior Scientist Assay Development & Screening at Axxima Pharmaceuticals 2000-2005: Postdoc at Stanford University in the laboratory of Brian Kobilka (biophysics on GPCRs) 1996-2000: Ph.D. thesis at Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry 1991-1996: Programm of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Munich.

Gennady Verkhivker

Gennady Verkhivker
Professor, Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine
Schmid College of Science & Technology, Chapman University
Gennady Verkhivker
Professor, Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine
Schmid College of Science & Technology, Chapman University
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Verkhivker is currently Professor of Computational Biosciences and Translational Medicine at Chapman University and Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Department of Pharmacology, UC San Diego. He received his PhD in Physical Chemistry from Moscow University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in computational biophysics from University of Illinois at Chicago in 1992. Dr. Verkhivker was one of the founding scientists at Agouron Pharmaceuticals Inc, in early 1990s and played a leading role in establishing computer-aided structure-based design technology. In 1993-2006, Dr. Verkhivker has held various research and management positions at Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Warner- Lambert, Pfizer Global Research and Development, La Jolla Laboratories. Since 2002, he has been Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UC San Diego. In 2006, he joined School of Pharmacy and Center for Bioinformatics, The University of Kansas as a Full Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Bioinformatics. In 2011 Dr. Verkhivker assumed position of Full Professor of Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine at Schmid College of Science & Technology and Professor at the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chapman University School of Pharmacy. Dr. Verkhivker authored more than 150 peer reviewed publications and is recognized for his research contributions in the fields of translational bioinformatics, computational biophysics and structure-based drug discovery of molecularly targeted and personalized anti-cancer agents. His most recent research activities are in the areas of computational systems biology, translational bioinformatics and systems pharmacology with the focus on integration of computational and experimental systems biology approaches in translational research.