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Enzymes in Drug Discovery Summit

2017-08-192017-11-222017-10-22
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The 2018 speakers list is currently being formed.

Please come back and visit this page for updates.

BELOW IS THE SPEAKERS LIST FROM 2017.

PLENARY KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Lawrence R. Dick

Lawrence R. Dick
Director of Biochemistry
Takeda
Lawrence R. Dick
Director of Biochemistry
Takeda
 
About Speaker:

Larry Dick holds a B.S. in biology from Marquette University and earned aPh.D. in biophysics from The University of Texas at Dallas in the laboratory of Professor Donald Gray. He did postdoctoral research at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center with Drs. Clive Slaughter and George DeMartino studying the structure and function of the proteasome. He began his industrial career at MyoGenics/ProScript and was part of the team that discovered the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor VELCADE (bortezomib). For the past 19 years he has worked in Discovery at Millennium/Takeda where he was Director of Biochemistry and a member of the teams that discovered the investigational NEDD8 activating enzyme inhibitor, pevonedistat, the investigational ubiquitin activating enzyme inhibitor, TAK-234, and the proteasome inhibitor NINLARO (ixazomib). Currently he is a Scientific Fellow in the Oncology Clinical Research group working on development of UPS-related investigational drugs.

Alfred Goldberg

Alfred Goldberg
Professor of Cell Biology
Harvard Medical School
Alfred Goldberg
Professor of Cell Biology
Harvard Medical School
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Goldberg, a Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School, has been on the faculty of that institution for nearly his entire academic career. His important discoveries have concerned the biochemical mechanisms and physiological regulation of protein breakdown in cells and the importance of this process in human disease. His laboratory first demonstrated the non-lysosomal ATP-dependent pathway for protein breakdown, now termed the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. They first demonstrated the involvement of the 20S and 26S proteasomes in this process and discovered the ATP-dependent proteases responsible for protein degradation in bacteria and mitochondria. Also of wide impact have been Dr. Goldberg’s studies showing that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is critical in the clearance of misfolded proteins and in muscle atrophy seen in many disease states as well as in antigen presentation to the immune system. He and his colleagues also first introduced proteasome inhibitors now widely used as research tools, and he initiated the development of the proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib/Velcade, now widely used in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

Dr. Goldberg received his AB degree and his PhD in Physiology in 1968 from Harvard University, after attending Cambridge University (as a Churchill Scholar) and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Goldberg’s accomplishments have been recognized with many distinguished prizes, including the Novartis-Drew Award, Severo Ochoa Award (New York University), Knobil Prize for Medical Research (Univ Texas, the Gabbay Award for Biotechnology and Medicine (Brandeis University), Norman Alpert Prize for Medical Research (Harvard), and Earnest Beutler Prize for Basic Research (Amer Hematology Soc.). He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institute of Medicine. He has received honorary degrees from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, the Univ of Maastricht (Netherlands) and Univ. of Barcelona (Spain) and is among the 1% most cited authors in the life sciences.

Tony Hunter

Tony Hunter
American Cancer Society Professor, Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Renato Dulbecco Chair
Salk Institute
Tony Hunter
American Cancer Society Professor, Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Renato Dulbecco Chair
Salk Institute
 
About Speaker: Tony Hunter is the Renato Dulbecco Chair in Cancer Research, Deputy Director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center and an American Cancer Society Professor in the Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla. In 1979, through his work on tumor viruses, he discovered a new class of protein kinase that phosphorylates tyrosine. He has spent most of the last 35 years studying protein kinases and phosphatases, and the role of protein phosphorylation in cell proliferation and the cell cycle, and how aberrant protein phosphorylation can cause cancer. His group also works on other types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including ubiquitylation and sumoylation, and crosstalk between PTMs. He has received many awards for his work on tyrosine phosphorylation, and is a member of several academic societies including the US National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of London.
PLENARY SPEAKERS
Anne Bang

Anne Bang
Director, Cell Biology
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
Anne Bang
Director, Cell Biology
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
 
About Speaker:

Anne Bang joined the Sanford Burnham Prebys in June 2010 as Director of Cell Biology at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, a state-of-the-art drug discovery center. Her efforts there are directed at developing patient-specific, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based models that reflect higher order cellular functions and disease phenotypes, yet have the throughput and reproducibility required for drug discovery and target identification. Prior to joining SBP she was at ViaCyte Inc. where, as Director of Stem Cell Research, she managed an interdisciplinary group of scientists working to develop hESC as a replenishable source of pancreatic cells for the treatment of diabetes. Dr. Bang has over 20 years of experience in the fields of developmental and stem cell biology, with a focus on neural development. She received a B.S. from Stanford, a Ph.D. in Biology from UCSD, and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Salk Institute.

Michael A. Mancini

Michael A. Mancini
Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
Michael A. Mancini
Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
 
About Speaker:

The Mancini lab focuses upon single cell analysis of steroid receptor functions, primarily estrogen and androgen receptors (ER, AR), and attendant coregulators. Our HCA/HCS-based projects explore cell signaling, endocrine disrupting chemicals and epigenetics at the single cell level in engineered and native cultured cells.

David Nolte

David Nolte
Distinguished Professor, Physics
Purdue University
David Nolte
Distinguished Professor, Physics
Purdue University
 
About Speaker:

David D. Nolte is the Edward M Purcell Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Purdue University performing research in the fields of optical technologies for molecular diagnostics and cancer therapeutics. He received his baccalaureate from Cornell University in 1981, his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley in 1988, and was a post-doctoral member of AT&T Bell Labs before joining the physics faculty at Purdue. He has been elected Fellow of the Optical Society of America, Fellow of the American Physical Society and Fellow of the AAAS. In 2005 he received the Herbert Newby McCoy Award of Purdue University. He has founded two biotech startup companies in the area of diagnostic screening and high-content analysis.

Sofie PattjIn

Sofie PattjIn
CTO
ImmunXperts SA
Sofie PattjIn
CTO
ImmunXperts SA
 
About Speaker:

Sofie Pattijn (CTO and founder, ImmunXperts) has over 20 years of experience in the field of immunogenicity assessment (vacci nes and biotherapeutics) and in vitro assay development. She has extensive hands-on lab experience and has managed and coached several In Vitro teams over the last decade. From 2008 till 2013 she was Head of the In Vitro Immunogenicity group at AlgoNom ics (Ghent, Belgium) and Lonza Applied Protein Services (Cambridge, UK). Prior to that, she worked at Innogenetics, Belgium for over 15 years.

Jan de Sonneville

Jan de Sonneville
CEO
Life Science Methods B.V.
Jan de Sonneville
CEO
Life Science Methods B.V.
 
About Speaker:

Born on 14-09-1980 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Bachelor in Electrical Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TUDelft), Master in NanoScience (Applied Physics), given as joint program by TUDelft and Leiden University, the Netherlands (2006). PhD on the development of four novel research methods for Cell Biology, thesis title: Reinventing microinjection, new microfluidic methods for cell biology (2011). Founded Life Science Methods BV to sell Automated Microinjection Systems for high throughput screening using cell spheroids and zebrafish embryos (2011).

Chris Wilson

Chris Wilson
Associate Director
Small Molecule Discovery Center, UCSF
Chris Wilson
Associate Director
Small Molecule Discovery Center, UCSF
 
About Speaker:

Chris Wilson is Associate Director of screening at the Small Molecule Discovery Center, UCSF Mission Bay,. He was previously a Senior Scientist at Ensemble Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA) and a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University, in the protein engineering group of Prof. Lynne Regan.

Roland Wolkowicz

Roland Wolkowicz
Professor, Director of the FACS Facility
San Diego State University
Roland Wolkowicz
Professor, Director of the FACS Facility
San Diego State University
 
About Speaker:

Roland Wolkowicz, Ph.D. is a Professor in Biology at San Diego State University in SD, CA. Born in Barcelona, Spain, he pursued undergraduate research in Biology at the University of Tel Aviv, Israel. Obtained his MSc in Microbiology from Tel Aviv University, and PhD in Molecular Cell Biology from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, where he studied the p53 DNA binding activity. As a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, he became acquainted with retroviral technology, peptide libraries and flow cytometry-based biological screenings. As a research associate at Stanford, he studied novel ways to block HIV-1 infection. In 2006, he joined the Department of Biology at San Diego State University, where he also serves as the Director of the FACS Core facility. His laboratory investigates viral-host interactions, focusing mainly on HIV-1 and Flaviviridae members such as HCV, Dengue virus, West Nile virus and Zika. His laboratory studies the effect of infection on host signaling cascades, and develops cell-based assays that monitor proteolytic cleavage for drug discovery.

Epigenetic Enzymes in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
No Records Found
Protease Inhibitors in Drug Discovery
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Marie-Pierre Bousquet-Dubouch

Marie-Pierre Bousquet-Dubouch
Assistant Professor
University of Toulouse
Marie-Pierre Bousquet-Dubouch
Assistant Professor
University of Toulouse
 
About Speaker:

Education:

1994: Engineer in biochemistry from Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse (INSAT).

1994: Master degree in Biotechnology - Microbiology, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse (INSAT).

1997 : Ph.D. in Biotechnology, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse (INSAT).

Experience:

1992-1994: Industrial trainee at ZENECA BioProducts (Billingham – England) – 18 months

1994-1997: Ph.D. thesis, Laboratory of Prof. P. MONSAN, Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes Biologiques et procédés (LISBP): Enzymatic synthesis of alpha-glucosides derivatives for cosmetic applications. Biocatalysis

1997-1999: Postdoctoral and research engineer positions, Centre Régional d’Innovation et de Transfert de Technologies (CRITT, Toulouse). Industrial research contract with ULICE (LIMAGRAIN group).

1999-2002: Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, Laboratory headed by Prof. M.D. Legoy, Laboratoire de Génie Protéique et Cellulaire (LGPC), University of La Rochelle: Fundamentals of gas/solid biocatalysis and application for enantioselective synthesis of chiral synthons.

Since 2002: Associate Professor of Biochemistry at University of Toulouse 3, Senior research scientist at Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, CNRS, Toulouse. Research expertise in Proteomics and mass spectrometry of biomolecules, structure-activity relationship of human proteasome complexes, study of protein complexes dynamics by quantitative proteomics, protein posttranslational modifications, targeted proteomics.

Philipp Ottis

Philipp Ottis
Postdoc Associate Lab of Prof. Craig M. Crews Molecuar, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Yale University
Philipp Ottis
Postdoc Associate Lab of Prof. Craig M. Crews Molecuar, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Yale University
 
About Speaker:

Philipp Ottis obtained his undergraduate degree in Biology from the University of Cologne, Germany, involving research in analytical natural compounds chemistry. Staying in Cologne, for his Master’s degree, Philipp focused on biochemical studies and research on post-translational protein modification. For his doctoral work, he joined the lab of Carsten Korth at the University of Dusseldorf, Germany, where Philipp studied aberrant protein accumulation associated with proteostasis impairment in brain aging and disease. Amongst other things, his work led to the identification of a previously unknown interaction of two major Schizophrenia risk-factor proteins and the Ziskind-Somerfeld Award of the Society of Biological Psychiatry.

Switching general research fields, yet staying with protein quality control, Philipp currently is a postdoctoral research associate in the group of Craig Crews at Yale University employing the Proteolysis Targeting Chimera (PROTAC) technology to target previously “undruggable” proteins and to study various downstream effects induced by spatio-temporally controlled ubiquitylation.

Eric Strieter

Eric Strieter
Assistant Professor
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Eric Strieter
Assistant Professor
University of Massachusetts Amherst
 
About Speaker:

Eric Strieter is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Eric received his B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Eric matriculated at MIT for graduate studies in 2000 and received his Ph.D. in 2005. His thesis work focused on investigating the mechanistic details of palladium- and copper-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions. He then was an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School with Prof. Chris Walsh where he studied natural product biosynthesis. In 2009, he began his independent career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In August 2016 he moved his lab to UMass-Amherst where he continues to investigate the chemistry and biology of protein ubiquitylation.

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Daniel Bachovchin

Daniel Bachovchin
Assistant Member, Chemical Biology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Daniel Bachovchin
Assistant Member, Chemical Biology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
 
About Speaker:

Daniel Bachovchin, Ph.D., is an Assistant Member in the Chemical Biology Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The Bachovchin lab uses chemical biology approaches to study the roles that proteases play in cancer and immune system signaling. Dr. Bachovchin performed graduate research at The Scripps Research Institute with Ben Cravatt and postdoctoral research at The Broad Institute with Todd Golub.

Dieter Brömme

Dieter Brömme
Professor, Canada Research Chair, Oral Biological and Medical Sciences
University of British Columbia
Dieter Brömme
Professor, Canada Research Chair, Oral Biological and Medical Sciences
University of British Columbia
 
About Speaker:

Dieter Brömme is a professor and Canada Research Chair in Proteases and Disease at the Department of Oral Biological and Medical Sciences of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver/Canada. He received his Ph.D. from the Martin-Luther-University (MLU) in Halle(Saale)/GDR in 1983. Since his post-graduate studies at the MLU he carried on his interest in lysosomal cysteine proteases and their role in human pathology throughout his career which included positions at the Biotechnology Research Institute in Montreal, at Khepri/Arris Pharmaceuticals in South San Francisco, and at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York before joining the University of British Columbia.

Antoine Dufour

Antoine Dufour
Postdoctoral Fellow, Chris Overall Lab
University of British Columbia
Antoine Dufour
Postdoctoral Fellow, Chris Overall Lab
University of British Columbia
 
About Speaker:

Antoine Dufour, Ph.D., is a post-doctoral fellow funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in the laboratory of Chris Overall, the pioneer of degradomics, at the University of British Columbia. He received his doctoral degree from Stony Brook University in chemical biology working on the development of exosite inhibitors (patent STONYB-16639) for the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases during cancer cell migration, invasion, angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. In 2014, Dr. Dufour was the chair of the Gordon Research Seminar “Proteolytic Enzymes & Their Inhibitors” in Il Ciocco, Italy. He currently studies the role of various proteases in immune regulation, viral response, cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases using degradomics and proteomics.

Mark Gorrell

Mark Gorrell
Molecular Hepatology Laboratory Head, Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine & Cell Biology
University of Sydney
Mark Gorrell
Molecular Hepatology Laboratory Head, Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine & Cell Biology
University of Sydney
 
About Speaker:

Associate Professor Mark Gorrell of the Centenary Institute, University of Sydney, trained in cell biology, virology, immunology and protein biochemistry at Australian National University, University of Melbourne and Johns Hopkins University. His research is focussed upon liver cancer prevention and treatment, chronic liver disease pathogenesis, diabetes, protein and protease biochemistry and cell biology related to the proteases DPP4, DPP9 and fibroblast activation protein (FAP). He has authored over 130 publications attracting >5,000 citations and H index 38.

Johanna Heideker

Johanna Heideker
PhD
Genentech
Johanna Heideker
PhD
Genentech
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Heideker received her PhD in 2012 from The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, studying the functions of a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase in DNA repair and genome maintenance in the laboratory of Michael (Nick) Boddy. From there she joined Ingrid E. Wertz' lab at Genentech as a Postdoctoral researcher, where she set out to explore novel roles of deubiquitinases (DUBs) in human disease. During her time at Genentech in collaboration with the Proteomics and Biostatistics departments she build a novel quantitative platform to measure deubiquitinase activity in a semi-native environment that can be used to both identify new cellular modes of DUB regulation as well as aid the development of compounds targeting DUB activity. Her assay is now being used across GNE departments to aid the study of DUBs and support drug discovery efforts targeting the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

Benedikt Kessler

Benedikt Kessler
Professor of Biochemistry and Life Science Mass Spectrometry
Oxford University
Benedikt Kessler
Professor of Biochemistry and Life Science Mass Spectrometry
Oxford University
 
About Speaker:
Tobias Kromann-Hansen

Tobias Kromann-Hansen
PhD
University of California San Diego
Tobias Kromann-Hansen
PhD
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Tobias Kromann-Tofting, PhD., is currently a Postdoc at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at University of California San Diego. Tobias Kromann-Tofting received his PhD in Molecular Biology from Aarhus University, Denmark. Tobias Kromann-Tofting’ research is concentrated on the development of inhibitors against trypsin-like serine proteases. Working with the protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), which is involved in progression of diseases such as arthritis and cancer, Tobias Kromann-Tofting has developed new principles for intervention with the catalytic activity of uPA by studying a new type of protease inhibitors namely singe domain antibody fragments from Camelids (Alpacas, Camels, Dromedaries and Llamas).

Gang Lin

Gang Lin
Associate Professor of Research in Microbiology and Immunology
Cornell University
Gang Lin
Associate Professor of Research in Microbiology and Immunology
Cornell University
 
About Speaker:

My lab focuses on developing species-selective or isoform-selective proteasome inhibitors for diseases, such as Tuberculosis, malaria, autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

Rama K. Mallampalli

Rama K. Mallampalli
UPMC Endowed Professor and Division Chief, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
University of Pittsburgh
Rama K. Mallampalli
UPMC Endowed Professor and Division Chief, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine
University of Pittsburgh
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Mallampalli is a UPMC Endowed Professor and Division Chief of Pulmonary Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He work is internationally recognized in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia as it relates to acute lung injury (ALI). His research has discovered a unique model for the molecular behavior of ubiquitin E3 ligase subunits belonging to the Skp-Cullin1-F box (SCF) family that control inflammation. Dr. Mallampalli’s laboratory designed, synthesized, and tested a new genus of ubiquitin E3 ligase (F box) inhibitors that modulate proteolysis thereby inhibiting inflammation in preclinical models of ALI and multi-organ failure.

Christopher M. Overall

Christopher M. Overall
Canada Research Chair in Protease Proteomics and Systems Biology
Centre for Blood Research, University of British Columbia
Christopher M. Overall
Canada Research Chair in Protease Proteomics and Systems Biology
Centre for Blood Research, University of British Columbia
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Overall is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Protease Proteomics and Systems Biology, U.B.C. Vancouver. With 23 Nature Review, Science, and Nature/Cell/Science-sister journal papers (h-index 67), he is a pioneer of degradomics, a term he coined. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto; and post-doctoral work with Dr. Michael Smith, Nobel Laureate. In 1997/1998 was a Visiting Senior Scientist at British Biotech, Oxford and in 2004/2008 a Visiting Senior Scientist at Novartis, Basel, and is now an Honorary Professor, Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg. Dr. Overall was 2002 CIHR Scientist of the Year, the UBC Killam Senior Researcher Award 2005, and was Chair of the 2003 MMP and the 2010 Protease Gordon Research Conferences. He was recognized by the IPS with the 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award; by the Matrix Biology Society of Australia and New Zealand with the 2012 Barry Preston Award; and in 2014 by the Tony Pawson Canadian National Proteomics Network Award for Outstanding Contribution and Leadership to the Canadian Proteomics Community. He is also an elected member of HUPO Executive Committee, the Chromosome Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) Executive Committee, and is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Proteomics Research.

Preety Panwar

Preety Panwar
Research Associate, OBMS
University of British Columbia
Preety Panwar
Research Associate, OBMS
University of British Columbia
 
About Speaker:

Preety Panwar, PhD., is a research associate in Dieter Bromme’s group at University of British Columbia. She has background in liposomes mediated drug delivery. Currently, she is investigating the mechanism of cathepsin K mediated extracellular matrix degradation, and identification of specific anti-collagenase inhibitors of cathepsin K and their in vitro and vivo evaluation.

Maurizio Pellecchia

Maurizio Pellecchia
Professor of Biomedical Sciences Daniel Hays Endowed Chair in Cancer Research
UC Riverside School of Medicine
Maurizio Pellecchia
Professor of Biomedical Sciences Daniel Hays Endowed Chair in Cancer Research
UC Riverside School of Medicine
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Pellecchia is a chemical biologist with a strong background in pharmaceutical chemistry, biophysics and translational medicine. He trained at the University of Naples (Italy) where he obtained a MS in Organic Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences, at the ETH-Zurich (working with 2002 Nobel Laureate Prof. Dr. Kurt Wüthrich) and the University of Michigan. Prior to his recruitment in 2002 at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research as Associate Professor, he spent a few years in the pharmaceutical industry. He has served on the faculty of the now Sanford Burnham Prebys medical Discovery Institute for 14 years where he also served as the Associate Director for Translational Research for the Institute’s NCI designated Cancer Center.

Since 2015 he is a Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of California at Riverside, School of Medicine and I hold the Daniel Hays endowed Chair in Cancer Research. In addition is the Director of the Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine at UCR. His research is at the forefront of academic drug discovery andchemical biology initiatives. His goals are to support target identification and validation studies in oncology, neurodegenerative, and infectious diseases. The laboratory focuses primarily on the development of innovative pharmacological agents and subsequently apply such agents in target validation studies using cellular and animal models, both internally and via collaborations. Central to these activities are the developing and the application of novel methods and strategies to drug discovery and translational medicine.

Luke Peterson

Luke Peterson
Assistant Research Scientist
University of Michigan
Luke Peterson
Assistant Research Scientist
University of Michigan
 
About Speaker: PhD from the University of Manchester UK, Postdoc The Scripps Research Institute La Jolla, CA University of Michigan since 2007
Guy Salvesen

Guy Salvesen
Professor, Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Immunology Program
NCI-Designated Cancer Center
Guy Salvesen
Professor, Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Immunology Program
NCI-Designated Cancer Center
 
About Speaker:
Kvido Strisovsky

Kvido Strisovsky
Principal Investigator
Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Kvido Strisovsky
Principal Investigator
Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
 
About Speaker:

Kvido Strisovsky, PhD, is a group leader at the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (IOCB) in Prague, Czech Republic. He received education at Charles University, Prague, and at Cambridge University and MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom. Dr. Strisovsky studies the mechanism and roles of intramembrane proteolysis in biological regulation. Most notably, he discovered the principles of substrate recognition by rhomboid proteases, his group was the first to solve a structure of an intramembrane protease with a fragment of its substrate and is a pioneer in the development of rhomboid protease inhibitors. Dr. Strisovsky is a member of the EMBO Young Investigator Programme.

Steven Wagner

Steven Wagner
Associate Professor, Neuroscience
University of California San Diego
Steven Wagner
Associate Professor, Neuroscience
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Steven Wagner PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD. He has spent over 25 years in the biopharmaceutical industry, and more recently in academia studying translational neuroscience of age-related neurodegenerative disorders with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). He led the team that discovered the first non-NSAID-like and truly “Notch-sparing” gamma-secretase modulators and introduced the term “gamma-secretase modulators” (GSMs) in 2005 through the discovery of a novel series of diaryl-2-aminothiazole derivatives that are over 5000-fold more potent at lowering A42 levels than the NSAID-like “substrate-targeted” gamma-secretase modulators, e.g., tarenflurbil. His team also, for the first time, purified to homogeneity the gamma-secretase enzyme complex that is ultimately responsible for generating amyloid β(Aβ) plaques, the diagnostic hallmark of AD. Since moving back to academia, into the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD in June of 2009, his laboratory, in addition to designing/discovering another novel and structurally distinct GSM chemotype, was awarded a Blueprint Neurotherapeutics U01 by NIH/NINDS (one of only seven issued in all of Neurology) to optimize and develop GSMs for the treatment and/or prevention of AD. He is also a member of the NIH Drug Discovery SBIR (ETTN-M)ETTN IRG, Division of Neuroscience, Development and Aging Study Section, a member of the NINDS Special Emphasis Panel for the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network, as well as a member of the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) Research Consortium and the Scientific Advisory Board for the Alzheimer’s Association’s Collaboration for Cure (C4C).

Ubiquitin Research and Drug Discovery
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Marie-Pierre Bousquet-Dubouch

Marie-Pierre Bousquet-Dubouch
Assistant Professor
University of Toulouse
Marie-Pierre Bousquet-Dubouch
Assistant Professor
University of Toulouse
 
About Speaker:

Education:

1994: Engineer in biochemistry from Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse (INSAT).

1994: Master degree in Biotechnology - Microbiology, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse (INSAT).

1997 : Ph.D. in Biotechnology, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse (INSAT).

Experience:

1992-1994: Industrial trainee at ZENECA BioProducts (Billingham – England) – 18 months

1994-1997: Ph.D. thesis, Laboratory of Prof. P. MONSAN, Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes Biologiques et procédés (LISBP): Enzymatic synthesis of alpha-glucosides derivatives for cosmetic applications. Biocatalysis

1997-1999: Postdoctoral and research engineer positions, Centre Régional d’Innovation et de Transfert de Technologies (CRITT, Toulouse). Industrial research contract with ULICE (LIMAGRAIN group).

1999-2002: Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, Laboratory headed by Prof. M.D. Legoy, Laboratoire de Génie Protéique et Cellulaire (LGPC), University of La Rochelle: Fundamentals of gas/solid biocatalysis and application for enantioselective synthesis of chiral synthons.

Since 2002: Associate Professor of Biochemistry at University of Toulouse 3, Senior research scientist at Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, CNRS, Toulouse. Research expertise in Proteomics and mass spectrometry of biomolecules, structure-activity relationship of human proteasome complexes, study of protein complexes dynamics by quantitative proteomics, protein posttranslational modifications, targeted proteomics.

Philipp Ottis

Philipp Ottis
Postdoc Associate Lab of Prof. Craig M. Crews Molecuar, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Yale University
Philipp Ottis
Postdoc Associate Lab of Prof. Craig M. Crews Molecuar, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Yale University
 
About Speaker:

Philipp Ottis obtained his undergraduate degree in Biology from the University of Cologne, Germany, involving research in analytical natural compounds chemistry. Staying in Cologne, for his Master’s degree, Philipp focused on biochemical studies and research on post-translational protein modification. For his doctoral work, he joined the lab of Carsten Korth at the University of Dusseldorf, Germany, where Philipp studied aberrant protein accumulation associated with proteostasis impairment in brain aging and disease. Amongst other things, his work led to the identification of a previously unknown interaction of two major Schizophrenia risk-factor proteins and the Ziskind-Somerfeld Award of the Society of Biological Psychiatry.

Switching general research fields, yet staying with protein quality control, Philipp currently is a postdoctoral research associate in the group of Craig Crews at Yale University employing the Proteolysis Targeting Chimera (PROTAC) technology to target previously “undruggable” proteins and to study various downstream effects induced by spatio-temporally controlled ubiquitylation.

Eric Strieter

Eric Strieter
Assistant Professor
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Eric Strieter
Assistant Professor
University of Massachusetts Amherst
 
About Speaker:

Eric Strieter is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Eric received his B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Eric matriculated at MIT for graduate studies in 2000 and received his Ph.D. in 2005. His thesis work focused on investigating the mechanistic details of palladium- and copper-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions. He then was an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School with Prof. Chris Walsh where he studied natural product biosynthesis. In 2009, he began his independent career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In August 2016 he moved his lab to UMass-Amherst where he continues to investigate the chemistry and biology of protein ubiquitylation.

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Eric Bennett

Eric Bennett
Assistant Professor
University of California San Diego
Eric Bennett
Assistant Professor
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:
BS - Biochemistry - Boston College 2001
PhD - Biology - Stanford University -2006
Postdoctoral Fellow - Harvard Medical School - laboratory of Wade Harper.
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Postdoctoral Fellowship
Assistant Professor at UCSD Division of Biological Sciences, Section of Cell and Developmental Biology
Luca Busino

Luca Busino
Assistant Professor
University of Pennsylvania
Luca Busino
Assistant Professor
University of Pennsylvania
 
About Speaker:

Luca Busino, PhD, is an Assistant Professor Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology, Department of Cancer Biology and Assistant Investigator at the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Busino received his graduate degree at the European Institute of Oncology in Italy and continued his training as post-doctoral fellow at the New York University. Dr. Busino team studies the molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation, specifically how misregulation of Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) contribute to cancer. His current research interest is focused on investigating the functions of novel ubiquitin ligases that are mutated and/or misregulated in hematologic diseases. Alterations of proteins degradation are common events in cancer, thus studying the ubiquitin pathway will provide novel avenues for therapeutics.

Yuan Chen

Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
 
About Speaker:

Yuan Chen, Ph.D., is currently Professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope. She obtained B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China, and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Rutgers University. After postdoctoral studies at the Scripps Research Institute, she joined Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope as tenure-track faculty in 1994. Her laboratory has made major contributions in elucidating the mechanism and regulation of the SUMOylation enzymes and discovered the SUMO-interacting motif that mediates most SUMO-dependent cellular functions. Her current research interests center on the mechanism and inhibition of enzymes in ubiquitin-like modifications and the role of ubiquitin-like modifications in major oncogenesis pathways.

Randy Hampton

Randy Hampton
Professor, Section of Cell and Developmental Biology
UC San Diego
Randy Hampton
Professor, Section of Cell and Developmental Biology
UC San Diego
 
About Speaker:
Tony Huang

Tony Huang
Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry
NYU School of Medicine
Tony Huang
Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry
NYU School of Medicine
 
About Speaker:

Tony Huang, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Mol Pharm at NYU School of Medicine. He received his undergraduate degree at UC-Berkeley, and Ph.D. at UW-Madison. He did his postdoctoral training with Dr. Alan D’Andrea at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, working on ubiquitin-mediated pathways in DNA repair. Dr. Huang has a long history working on ubiquitin-related signaling pathways. His lab currently focuses on projects involving the Fanconi Anemia genome stability pathway, DNA damage tolerance, and generating ubiquitin tools to study ubiquitin and Ubl dynamics.

Claudio Joazeiro

Claudio Joazeiro
Associate Professor, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
Claudio Joazeiro
Associate Professor, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
 
About Speaker:
Matt Johnson

Matt Johnson
Chief Scientific Officer
Avacta Life Sciences
Matt Johnson
Chief Scientific Officer
Avacta Life Sciences
 
About Speaker:

Matt completed a PhD in Molecular Biology investigating novel surface proteins of the B. cereus endospore. As part of this, he completed an EMBO short-term fellowship at the Pasteur Institute in Paris looking at the same proteins in B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. After completing his PhD, Matt took a Postdoctoral position in the Department of Biochemistry at Cambridge University. Matt joined Abcam in 2005, his career developing as the company grew to become the leading provider of research-grade antibodies in the life sciences market. He held several roles over his 8 years in the company, culminating in the post of Head of R&D. He built and ran a research group with interests in recombinant antibody/binder technologies, alternative detection methodologies, immunoassay development and antibody characterisation. Matt became CTO of Avacta Life Sciences in 2013.

Lorna Kategaya

Lorna Kategaya
Senior Research Associate
Genentech
Lorna Kategaya
Senior Research Associate
Genentech
 
About Speaker:
Chang-Wei Liu

Chang-Wei Liu
Assistant Professor
University of Colorado
Chang-Wei Liu
Assistant Professor
University of Colorado
 
About Speaker:

Chang-Wei, Liu, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He received his PhD degree in Analytic Chemistry from Chinese Academy of Sciences. He switched his research interest to biology during his postdoctoral training at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Since then his research interest is related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system and neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, his group studies the functions and therapeutic potentials of several deubiquitinating enzymes in the ubiquitin-specific protease family.

Jason MacGurn

Jason MacGurn
Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Jason MacGurn
Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
 
About Speaker:

Jason MacGurn, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. His main research interests include ubiquitin biology and membrane trafficking. Since arriving at Vanderbilt, Jason and his team have used a variety of biochemical, proteomic, and live cell imaging methodologies to discover new pathways that regulate protein degradation. Jason holds a B.A. in biological sciences from The University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics from UCSF.

Gentry Patrick

Gentry Patrick
Associate Professor and Vice Chair
University of California San Diego
Gentry Patrick
Associate Professor and Vice Chair
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:
Matthew Petroski

Matthew Petroski
Associate Professor
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Matthew Petroski
Associate Professor
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Matthew Petroski is an Associate Professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla, California, USA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine and did post-doctoral training at Caltech. His research program focuses on ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like protein signaling and their roles in diseases such as cancer.

Ryan Potts

Ryan Potts
Assistant Professor
UT Southwestern
Ryan Potts
Assistant Professor
UT Southwestern
 
About Speaker:

Ryan Potts obtained his B.S. in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2000, and his Ph.D. in Cell Regulation from the UT Southwestern Medical Center in 2007. He then did his postdoctoral research at UT Southwestern Medical Center in the Department of Biochemistry as a Sara and Frank McKnight Independent Postdoctoral Fellow (2008-2011). In September 2011, Dr. Potts joined the Department of Physiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center as a tenure-track Assistant Professor. In January 2016, he moved to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as Associate Professor in the department of Cell and Molecular Biology. His scientific interest is in delineating the functions of the MAGE family of E3 ubiquitin ligase regulators.

Farid El Qualid
Farid El Qualid
CSO
UbiQ
 
About Speaker:

Farid El Qualid received his PhD in Bioorganic Chemistry in 2005 from Leiden University (The Netherlands). After his PhD, Farid performed post-doctoral research at Oxford University (UK) and it was during this period that he started getting interested in the emerging Ubiquitin Proteasome Field. In 2008 he joined the Netherlands Cancer Institute where he focused on the development of chemical technologies for ubiquitin(-like protein) based research tools. Based on this, he co-founded UbiQ in 2010, where he is responsible for general lab management and product development.

Steven I. Reed

Steven I. Reed
Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
Steven I. Reed
Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Steven Reed, Ph.D. is Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla. He received an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Stanford University. Dr. Reed carried out postdoctoral research with Nobel laureate Leland Hartwell at the University of Washington and held a faculty position at the University of California, Santa Barbara prior to assuming his current position. He is known for his pioneering work on the roles and regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases in cell cycle control and oncogenesis. More recently he and his wife, Susanna Ekholm-Reed, discovered a novel pathway linking the ubiquitin ligase parkin directly to neuronal survival, leading to identification of a potential therapeutic target for treating Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Reed is a founder of NeuroMantis Pharmaceuticals, a company dedicated to developing therapeutics targeting neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative disease and other pathological conditions.

Pengbo Zhou

Pengbo Zhou
Professor
Weill Cornell Medical College
Pengbo Zhou
Professor
Weill Cornell Medical College
 
About Speaker:

Pengbo Zhou, Ph.D., is Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University. He received a B.S. degree in Biology from Peking University and Ph.D. degree in Biological Chemistry from the University of Michigan. Dr. Zhou has more than 18 years of experience in studying Cullin (CUL) family of ubiquitin ligases. He has made significant contributions to the understanding of many aspects of cullin biology and regulation, including the initial discovery of the autoubiquitination mechanism by which CUL1 dynamically assembles with distinct substrate receptors (F-box proteins) for targeting a wide range of substrates; the engineering of CUL1-based ubiquitin ligase for the development of the patented “Protein Knockout” technology, and the recent discovery of the CUL4A ubiquitin ligase in governing DNA repair/DNA damage checkpoint response, hematopoiesis and tumorigenesis. Recently, he has developed a high throughput screen platform to identify inhibitors of the CRL4 ubiquitin ligases.

Protein Kinases in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Lalima Ahuja

Lalima Ahuja
Department of Pharmacology and Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of California San Diego
Lalima Ahuja
Department of Pharmacology and Chemistry and Biochemistry
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:
Huifen Chen

Huifen Chen
Senior Scientist
Genentech
Huifen Chen
Senior Scientist
Genentech
 
About Speaker:
James Dowling

James Dowling
Principal Scientist
AstraZeneca
James Dowling
Principal Scientist
AstraZeneca
 
About Speaker:
Jose Duca

Jose Duca
Head, Computer-Aided Drug Discovery
Novartis
Jose Duca
Head, Computer-Aided Drug Discovery
Novartis
 
About Speaker:

José is Global Head of Computer Aided Drug Discovery (CADD), part of Global Discovery Chemistryat theNovartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR).

José joined Novartis in 2010. Previously hehadbeen with the Schering-Plough Research Instituteand Merck Research Laboratoriesin Kenilworth, NJ, USAfor 10 years where hehad increasing responsibilities in the CADD group.His scientific fields of expertise within computational chemistry comprisemolecular thinking, modeling,ab initiocalculations, molecular recognition, QM-MM methods, solvationand structure-based drug design.José is passionate about drug discovery.

He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the National University of Córdoba, Argentina. He joined Prof. Tony Hopfinger’s group in theCollege of Pharmacy at the University of Illinois at Chicago as a Postdoctoral Fellow.

Istvan Enyedy

Istvan Enyedy
Senior Scientist, Chemistry
Biogen
Istvan Enyedy
Senior Scientist, Chemistry
Biogen
 
About Speaker:

In the past 18 years Istvan J Enyedy has been involved in new target evaluation, hit finding, and hit-to-lead optimization projects for several types of target classes using both ligand and structure-based methods. He is coauthor on more than 40 publications and 13 patents/applications. He received his PhD in 1998 at Catholic University of America, Washington DC, and did postdoctoral training in Dr. Shaomeng Wang’s group at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington DC. Between 2001 and 2008 he worked at Bayer Pharmaceuticals, West Haven CT and Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research in Cambridge MA. Since August 2008 he has been working at Biogen Idec, in Cambridge MA.

Said Goueli

Said Goueli
Senior Research Fellow, Research and Development
Promega
Said Goueli
Senior Research Fellow, Research and Development
Promega
 
About Speaker:

Said Goueli is a Senior Research Fellow at Promega Corporation. He is the founder of the cell signaling group, where his focus is mainly directed at biochemical assays to study cell signaling and, most recently, on cell based technologies to monitor cellular metabolites in normal and abnormal cell growth. In addition to his role at Promega, Said holds a joint appointment as clinical Professor in the department of Pathology and Lab Medicine at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Said has pioneered novel technologies that advanced research in cell signaling. He was one of the first to develop anti phosphospecific antibodies, and has over 80 peer reviewed publications and holds over 15 issued and several pending patents on kinase assays (radioactive, fluorescent, and luminescent) and related technologies. He has also developed novel technologies in monitoring the activity of protein phosphatases and is currently developing luminescent assays for monitoring the activity of phospholipid phosphatases.

Said has also developed a novel strategy to monitor the modulation of Gs and Gi-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCR), GTPases, and Phosphodiesterases. His interest has expanded most recently to newer areas of cell signaling research as evidenced by his development of universal assays for all classes of methyltransferases.

Rod Hubbard

Rod Hubbard
Professor
Vernalis and University of York
Rod Hubbard
Professor
Vernalis and University of York
 
About Speaker:

Rod Hubbard has been working with methods for analysis and exploitation of protein structure for nearly 35 years. In the 1980s, he developed molecular graphics and modelling methods. In the 1990s he helped build the Structural Biology Lab at the University of York and determined the structure of many proteins of therapeutic importance; this was combined with studies of protein-ligand interactions and some of the first work in finding small fragments that bind to protein targets. In 1997, he was a founding SAB member of the structure-based pharmaceutical company that became Vernalis. Since 2001, he has spent varying amounts of his time at Vernalis, establishing and applying structure and fragment-based methods for drug discovery. He currently splits his time between York and Vernalis; in addition, he is a member of various boards and panels for the UK Research Councils and consults with pharmaceutical and technology companies around the world.

Alexandr Kornev

Alexandr Kornev
Dr., Pharmacology
University of California San Diego
Alexandr Kornev
Dr., Pharmacology
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Alexandr Kornev is a project scientist at the University of California San Diego. He studied molecular biophysics in the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in Russia, and received his PhD in biophysics at the Semyonov Institute of Chemical Physics. He started his career in the US at UCSD in 2002 studying structural features of protein kinases. His model of protein kinase activation published in 2006 received a worldwide recognition and has become a de facto standard for active protein kinase structures. His scientific interests include computational studies of allosteric regulation of protein kinases and proteins in general.

Nicholas Levinson

Nicholas Levinson
Assistant Professor, Pharmacology
University of Minnesota
Nicholas Levinson
Assistant Professor, Pharmacology
University of Minnesota
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Levinson obtained his Ph.D. in 2008 from the University of California, Berkeley, where he studied the structural biology of the tyrosine kinases Abl, Src and Csk. He pursued postdoctoral training at Stanford University in biophysical chemistry and worked on the application of vibrational spectroscopy to biological systems. In 2014, Dr. Levinson was appointed Assistant Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His lab studies the biophysical basis of allosteric regulation in the protein kinases using diverse spectroscopic methods including vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance.

Lars Neumann

Lars Neumann
Assays, Biophysics & Screening
Proteros Biostructures
Lars Neumann
Assays, Biophysics & Screening
Proteros Biostructures
 
About Speaker:

2008-current: Head of Assays, Biophysics & Screening at Proteros Biostructures 2005-2008: Group Leader Assay Development & Screening at GPC Biotech 2002-2005: Senior Scientist Assay Development & Screening at Axxima Pharmaceuticals 2000-2005: Postdoc at Stanford University in the laboratory of Brian Kobilka (biophysics on GPCRs) 1996-2000: Ph.D. thesis at Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry 1991-1996: Programm of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Munich.

Deqiang Niu

Deqiang Niu
Director, Chemistry
Celgene
Deqiang Niu
Director, Chemistry
Celgene
 
About Speaker:

Deqiang Niu, Ph.D., is director of medicinal chemistry at Celgene Avilomics Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He oversees the medicinal chemistry research and the HTMC lab (High Throughput Medicinal Chemistry). Dr. Niu has been with Celgene Avilomics Research since early 2008 - he joined Avila Therapeutics in 2008, and became part of Celgene Corp. through an acquisition in 2012. Before his current position, Dr. Niu had worked at Enanta pharmaceuticals and Biogen Idec, both located in the greater Boston area, with increased responsibilities. Dr. Niu's drug discovery experience covers infectious, oncology and autoimmune diseases. The molecular targets of interest include proteases, kinases, protein synthesis and targeted covalent inhibitors for many protein targets. He had been involved in projects that yielded multiple preclinical, clinical candidates and an approved drug.

Dr. Niu holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from Peking University and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from New York University. Dr. Niu completed his postdoctoral training with Professor Gilbert Stork at Columbia University, where he completed the total synthesis of Quinine.

Oliver Plettenburg

Oliver Plettenburg
Professor, Institute of Medicinal Chemistry
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health
Oliver Plettenburg
Professor, Institute of Medicinal Chemistry
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health
 
About Speaker:

Oliver Plettenburg is Director of the Institute of Medicinal Chemistry at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Health in Munich and Professor for Medicinal Chemistry at Leibniz Universität Hannover. Previously he held various positions within the pharmaceutical industry, last as Head of Biosensors & Chemical Probes in Sanofi’s Diabetes Division. The group’s main responsibility was to support evaluation of validity of novel targets, provide tools to visualize pathologically relevant processes, to develop new methods to quantify important biomarkers and to explore new treatment options at the drug-device interface.

Oliver was with Sanofi for 14 years. Before joining the Diabetes Division he worked as a project leader in several medicinal chemistry projects in the area of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases and was deeply involved in the Chemical Biology approach within Aventis.

After receiving his PhD in organic chemistry, he joined The Scripps Research Institute as a postdoctoral fellow, working in the group of Chi-Huey Wong on the total synthesis of glycosyl sphingosides.

Lixin Qiao

Lixin Qiao
Sr. Principal Scientist, Medicinal Chemistry
Celgene
Lixin Qiao
Sr. Principal Scientist, Medicinal Chemistry
Celgene
 
About Speaker:

Lixin Qiao received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry (SIOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and completed his postdoctoral fellowship at Georgetown University Medical School. After working at ArQule for 5 years in compound library design and high-throughput synthesis, he joined Avila Therapeutics Inc. in 2008, which later became Celgene Avilomic Research. His work has been focused on the structure-based drug discovery of irreversible inhibitors on protein kinases and proteases. He was the project leader of ERK program, carrying the ERK inhibitor from the discovery to early development.

Rob Ruijtenbeek

Rob Ruijtenbeek
Vice President Research & Development
PamGene
Rob Ruijtenbeek
Vice President Research & Development
PamGene
 
About Speaker:

Dr Rob Ruijtenbeek is Vice President R&D at Pamgene (‘s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands), where he heads a multidisciplinary R&D team performing research and development of peptide microarray products and applications in the field of kinases, phosphatases, nuclear receptors and other drug targets. The focus of his current research is the application of peptide microarrays in biomarker discovery in clinical oncology, predicting response to therapy. He is affiliated with the medicinal chemistry and chemical biology group of Utrecht University, where new applications for the peptide microarray technology are investigated in the area of pharmaceutical research & development. This has resulted in multiple scientific publications, patent applications and commercialized products.

Rob Ruijtenbeek holds a M.Sc. degree in both biochemistry and organic chemistry from the University of Nijmegen (1996) and received his Ph.D. degree in 2001 at the faculty of Pharmacy of the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Elisabeth Schneider

Elisabeth Schneider
Robert-Huber fellow, Emeritusgruppe Huber
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry
Elisabeth Schneider
Robert-Huber fellow, Emeritusgruppe Huber
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry
 
About Speaker:

Elisabeth V. Schneider, Ph.D., received her Ph.D. at Technische Universität München under supervision of Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. Robert Huber, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, working at the laboratories of Proteros Biostructures GmbH. Currently, she holds the Robert-Huber fellowship. Dr. Schneider is a specialist on kinases, especially Cyclin-dependent kinases. She solved the first crystal structure of the human CDK8/CycC complex and collaborated on several projects with partners from industry and academia in order to identify CDK8/CycC specific compounds. In addition, her current work involves further protein complexes interacting with CDK8 such as the CKM module of the Mediator of transcription and members of the JAK family, including protein purification, biochemical assays, compound screening and kinetic profiling as well as crystallographic studies.

Alexander Statsyuk

Alexander Statsyuk
Assistant Professor, Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Houston
Alexander Statsyuk
Assistant Professor, Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Houston
 
About Speaker:

Alexander Statsyuk obtained his PhD degree at the University of Chicago in 2006 working with Sergey A Kozmin, where he synthesized natural product Bistramide A and showed that bistramide A inhibits actin polymerization. He then completed his postdoctoral work with Kevan M Shokat at UCSF, where he was working on the development of chemical cross-linkers to identify upstream kinases of protein phosphorylation sites. In 2010, he started his independent career at the Department of Chemistry Northwestern University and then moved to the University of Houston in 2016. His research program addresses the need of developing chemical probes to study the ubiquitin system. Alexander Statsyuk is a recipient of Pew Scholarship award and is an author of 20 manuscripts and has 9 pending patent applications.

Gennady Verkhivker

Gennady Verkhivker
Professor, Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine
Schmid College of Science & Technology, Chapman University
Gennady Verkhivker
Professor, Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine
Schmid College of Science & Technology, Chapman University
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Verkhivker is currently Professor of Computational Biosciences and Translational Medicine at Chapman University and Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Department of Pharmacology, UC San Diego. He received his PhD in Physical Chemistry from Moscow University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in computational biophysics from University of Illinois at Chicago in 1992. Dr. Verkhivker was one of the founding scientists at Agouron Pharmaceuticals Inc, in early 1990s and played a leading role in establishing computer-aided structure-based design technology. In 1993-2006, Dr. Verkhivker has held various research and management positions at Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Warner- Lambert, Pfizer Global Research and Development, La Jolla Laboratories. Since 2002, he has been Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UC San Diego. In 2006, he joined School of Pharmacy and Center for Bioinformatics, The University of Kansas as a Full Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Bioinformatics. In 2011 Dr. Verkhivker assumed position of Full Professor of Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine at Schmid College of Science & Technology and Professor at the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chapman University School of Pharmacy. Dr. Verkhivker authored more than 150 peer reviewed publications and is recognized for his research contributions in the fields of translational bioinformatics, computational biophysics and structure-based drug discovery of molecularly targeted and personalized anti-cancer agents. His most recent research activities are in the areas of computational systems biology, translational bioinformatics and systems pharmacology with the focus on integration of computational and experimental systems biology approaches in translational research.

Daniel Whalen

Daniel Whalen
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Genentech
Daniel Whalen
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Genentech
 
About Speaker:

Dan Whalen is a Postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology at Genentech, in Sarah Hymowitz’ s lab. He is focused on the study of protein kinases, using biochemical, biophysical and structural techniques, with a particular interest in the RAF/MEK/ERK MAPK pathway.

In work recently published in Cancer Cell alongside colleagues Shiva Malek and Scott Foster et al., he solved several crystal structures of a short in-frame deletion BRAF mutant. These mutants, analogous to the recurrent EGFR exon 19 deletion, are activating in patient tumor samples.

The crystal structures revealed the activation mechanism of this emergent class ofactivating mutations for the first time; that the deletion biases the conformation of αC to the ‘ in’ position. Restraining αC conformation in this manner confers resistance to αC “out” inhibitors vemurafenib and lapatinib.

He previously studied for his DPhil at the University of Oxford, in the lab of Christian Siebold, where he solved several novel protein crystal structures, including the Smoothened ectodomain and multiple Sonic Hedgheog-glycosaminoglycan complex crystal structures. These data were leveraged to provide new insights into the regulation of Smoothened and the Hedgehog morphogenetic pathway.

Shuxing Zhang

Shuxing Zhang
Associate Professor, Experimental Therapeutics
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Shuxing Zhang
Associate Professor, Experimental Therapeutics
MD Anderson Cancer Center
 
About Speaker:

Prof. Shuxing Zhang has been working in the area of drug discovery and computational modeling for nearly 20 years in academia, industry, and government agencies. Currently he is Associate Professor at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Director of Molecular Modeling and Structural Biology Core established based on his unique cheminformatics, bioinformatics, and systems chemical biology integrated platform. Using these state-of-the-art technologies, Dr. Zhang has developed a variety of promising therapeutic agents currently undergoing preclinical or clinical studies. In 2009, he co-founded PHusis Therapeutics to translate his Akt-targeted kinase inhibitors currently in IND application and recently he started another company TheraXen Technology to commercialize his PH domain-based technologies. These intensive experiences signify Dr. Zhang’s resolve as a scientific entrepreneur to translate his laboratory discoveries to product commercialization and clinical patient treatment. Dr. Zhang has received numerous prestigious awards and his pioneering studies are widely supported by NIH, DOD, NSF, and many other funding agencies.