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Enzymes in Drug Discovery Summit

2018-01-222018-01-092017-10-27
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PLENARY KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Matthew Bogyo

Matthew Bogyo
Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University
Matthew Bogyo
Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Bogyo is a Professor of Pathology and Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University. He received his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Bates College in 1993 and a doctorate in Chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997. Dr. Bogyo established an independent scientific career as a Faculty Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco in 1998, where he supervised a small laboratory of post-doctoral fellows and students. In 2001, Dr. Bogyo was hired to establish and direct the Chemical Proteomics Department at Celera Genomics focused on applying small molecule probes to the field of drug discovery. Dr. Bogyo then joined the Department of Pathology at Stanford University in July 2003 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2009 and to full professor in 2013. His laboratory works on the development of new chemical probe technologies that are applied to study the role of proteases and hydrolases in complex biological pathways associated with human disease. Dr. Bogyo has published over 200 primary research publications and currently serves on the Editorial Board of several prominent research journals. He was the President of the International Proteolysis Society from 2007-2009 and is the chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Proteolytic Enzymes and Their Inhibitors in 2018 and the Imaging in 2020 meeting in 2016. Dr. Bogyo is also a member of Stanford’s Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) and the ChEM-H Institute at Stanford. He is a consultant for several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in the Bay Area and is the co-founder of Akrotome Imaging, a small start up company developing imaging contrast agents for detection of surgical margins. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Searle Scholar Award, the Terman Fellowship and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in Pathogenesis award.

Judith Clements

Judith Clements
Distinguished Professor
Queensland University of Technology
Judith Clements
Distinguished Professor
Queensland University of Technology
 
About Speaker:

Judith Clements leads the Kallikrein Protease and Tumour Microenvironment Group Queensland University of Technology (QUT) where the focus of her research is the role of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (the current test for prostate cancer)-related peptidases and their utility as biomarkers or therapeutic targets for prostate and ovarian cancer. In recognition of her contribution to the kallikrein field internationally, she was awarded the prestigious EK Frey Werle Silver & Gold Medals, in 2000 & 2007, respectively. She was also recently elected as a member of the International Proteolysis Society Council for 2014-2017 and to the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences in 2017. She has over 240 publications in scientific journals and collaborates widely with colleagues in the US, Canada, the UK and Europe. She initiated and led the Cancer Program at QUT from 1997-2014. She co-founded, and was Scientific Director (2009-2017), of the Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, at QUT in Brisbane, Australia. She co-founded and directed until 2017 the national prostate cancer tissue bank – the Australian Prostate Cancer BioResource - which is a key resource (>6500 men recruited to date) that underpins prostate cancer research nationally and is co-leader of the Queensland node of the international genome wide association study consortium for prostate cancer, PRACTICAL, that has discovered >140 new genetic regions that are associated with prostate cancer risk. She was awarded the Queensland Women in Technology Biotech Outstanding Achievement Award for 2012, and the prestigious title of Distinguished Professor, the first woman in QUT’s history, in 2013. She was awarded the Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in 2015.

Dash Dhanak

Dash Dhanak (TBC)
Global Head, Discovery Sciences
Janssen Research & Development
Dash Dhanak (TBC)
Global Head, Discovery Sciences
Janssen Research & Development
 
About Speaker:
Jack Taunton

Jack Taunton
Professor, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California, San Francisco
Jack Taunton
Professor, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California, San Francisco
 
About Speaker: Jack Taunton obtained his Ph.D. in chemistry from Harvard University. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School, Jack joined the faculty of the University of California, San Francisco, where he is currently a Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology. His research focuses on the structure-based design of covalent inhibitors, as well as mechanistic studies of biologically active natural products. Jack has been named an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, a Searle Scholar, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Jack is a co-founder of Principia BioPharma, Global Blood Therapeutics, and Kezar Life Sciences.
Epigenetic Enzymes in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Edward Kai-Hua Chow

Edward Kai-Hua Chow
Professor, Department of Pharmacology
National University of Singapore
Edward Kai-Hua Chow
Professor, Department of Pharmacology
National University of Singapore
 
About Speaker:

Edward Kai-Hua Chow is an Assistant Professor and Principal Investigatort at National University of Singapore (NUS) in the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and the Department of Pharmacology. He received his B.A. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. at UCLA. Prior to joining NUS, Dr. Chow was a Postdoctoral Fellow under the guidance of Prof. J. Michael Bishop at UCSF. His research group is interested in understanding how specific genomic alterations affect cancer progression and how this information can be applied towards engineering-based approaches to improve cancer therapy through combinatorial drug design and nanotechnology-based drug delivery and imaging applications. His group is particularly interested in overcoming drug resistance in haematological malignancies and hepatocellular carcinoma.

Steve Finkbeiner

Steve Finkbeiner
Director, Center for Neurodegenerative Disease; Professor, Neurology and Physiology
Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease; University of California, San Francisco
Steve Finkbeiner
Director, Center for Neurodegenerative Disease; Professor, Neurology and Physiology
Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease; University of California, San Francisco
 
About Speaker: Dr. Finkbeiner studies the molecular mechanisms relating to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases focusing on the role of protein dyshomeostasis in Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Frontotemporal dementia. In this context, he has developed a robotic microscopy, a fully automated high throughput single cell analysis platform that provides very sensitive measures of phenotypes, which has been used to discover disease-related phenotypes in differentiated neurons from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Finkbeiner earned concurrently an MD and a PhD from Yale University, followed by an internship and chief residency at the University of California, San Francisco, and a research fellowship at Harvard Medical School.
Haiching Ma

Haiching Ma
Chief Science Officer
Reaction Biology
Haiching Ma
Chief Science Officer
Reaction Biology
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Haiching Ma is the Chief Scientific Officer and a Board Director of Reaction Biology Corp. and has played essential roles in developing and commercializing RBC’s drug screening, profiling and early drug discovery technologies. His recent research has focused on epigenetic and kinase targets and the development of biological and chemical tools for understanding their biochemical and cellular functions. As Principle Investigator, he has been awarded over $12 million in NIH SBIR and RO1 grants to pursue research projects on drug discovery and probe development for epigenetic, kinase and protease targets, technology development for small molecule and protein microarray platforms and assay development to enable early drug discovery efforts targeting kinases and epigenetic modulators. Dr. Ma currently serves as a national Steering Committee Member for the NIH National Cancer Institute’s Chemical Biology Consortium.

Tamara Maes

Tamara Maes
CSO
Oryzon
Tamara Maes
CSO
Oryzon
 
About Speaker:

Tamara Maes is BsC in Chemistry and PhD in Biotechnology from the University of Ghent, Belgium and  Co-founder,  CSO and VP of Oryzon Genomics S.A., a clinical stage biopharmarmaceutical company listed on the MADRID Stock Exchange Market (ORY).

Alexey Terskikh

Alexey Terskikh
CSO
Stelvio Therapeutics
Alexey Terskikh
CSO
Stelvio Therapeutics
 
About Speaker:
Muzhou Wu

Muzhou Wu
Instructor, Dermatology
Boston University School of Medicine
Muzhou Wu
Instructor, Dermatology
Boston University School of Medicine
 
About Speaker:

I earned my Ph.D. in Stony Brook University, followed by postdoctoral training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Boston University Department of Dermatology. My research focus on the study of epigenetic alternations in melanoma and other malignancies. Using novel small molecule inhibitors targeting specific epigenetic protein, we seek to identify transcriptional regulators of cancer progression, and develop targeted epigenetic therapy for melanoma.

Protease Inhibitors in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Tauseef Butt

Tauseef Butt
President and CEO
Progenra
Tauseef Butt
President and CEO
Progenra
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Butt obtained Master’s Degrees in Biochemistry from the University of Dundee, Scotland, UK. His Ph.D. degree in Molecular Biology was awarded by The University of Glasgow, Scotland, He was a Staff Fellow at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, before joining SmithKline Beckman (now GSK) Pharmaceuticals. He worked in number of therapeutic areas during his 14 years in the SmithKline organization, where he was Assistant Director in Research and Development. Dr. Butt serves as an Adjunct Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Drexel University, Philadelphia and is active in a number of national and regional professional organizations, including several dedicated to biotechnology. He has a track record of establishing successful biotech companies that are profitable. He has raised several million dollars and brought numerous technologies and products to the market. Dr. Butt is a co-founder of Progenra, Inc.

Julio A. Camarero

Julio A. Camarero
Professor, Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Southern California School of Pharmacy
Julio A. Camarero
Professor, Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Southern California School of Pharmacy
 
About Speaker:

Professor Camarero started his studies in chemistry at the University if Barcelona (Spain), received his Master degree in 1992, and finished his PhD thesis there in 1996. Afterwards he joined the group of Prof. Tom W. Muir at The Rockefeller University as a Burroughs Wellcome Fellow where he contributed to the development of new chemoselective ligation techniques for the chemical engineering of proteins. In 2000, he moved to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a Distinguished Lawrence Fellow where he became staff scientist and head of laboratory in 2003. He joined the University of Southern California in 2008 as an Associate Professor, becoming Full Professor in 2015. His current research interests are focused in the development of new bioorganic approaches using protein splicing and synthetic protein chemistry for studying biological processes involved in cancer and how can be modulated or inhibited by novel microprotein scaffolds. Professor Camarero has authored over 90 peer-reviewed publications and five invited book chapters.

Sirano Dhe-Paganon

Sirano Dhe-Paganon
Lead Scientist, Department of Cancer Biology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Sirano Dhe-Paganon
Lead Scientist, Department of Cancer Biology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
About Speaker: Structural biologist working on cancer targets.
Doug Johnson

Doug Johnson
Research Fellow, Chemical Biology
Pfizer
Doug Johnson
Research Fellow, Chemical Biology
Pfizer
 
About Speaker:

Douglas Johnson is a Research Fellow and Head of Chemical Biology at Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development in Cambridge, MA. During his tenure at Pfizer, he has played significant roles on teams that have advanced several clinical candidates including palbociclib (PD 0332991), a CDK4/6 inhibitor approved in 2015 for the treatment of breast cancer; PF-00217830, a D2 partial agonist for schizophrenia; PF-04457845, a FAAH inhibitor for the potential treatment of CNS disorders; and PF-06648671, a γ-secretase modulator for Alzheimer’s Disease. In addition, his group is interested in applying chemical biology methods to enable drug discovery projects. His group has used clickable photoaffinity probes to characterize the targets and the mechanism of action of gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and modulators (GSMs) and the off-target of 1st generation BACE inhibitors responsible for the observed ocular toxicity. Prior to Pfizer, Doug was an NIH postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University in the laboratory of Professor David A. Evans. He obtained his Ph.D. in organic chemistry at The Scripps Research Institute under the guidance of Professor Dale L. Boger and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota with a BS in chemistry.

Bob Lazarus

Bob Lazarus
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
Bob Lazarus
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
 
About Speaker:

Bob Lazarus is a Principal Scientist in the Department of Early Discovery Biochemistry at Genentech, Inc. He joined Genentech in 1983 after receiving his Ph.D. in Chemistry (1979) and carrying out postdoctoral research at Penn State University. He served as the Secretary and then President of the International Proteolysis Society from 2011-2015. Bob has explored protein engineering and mechanistic enzymology projects to investigate molecular, biochemical and biological aspects of protein/protein and protein/ligand interactions. His research areas have included tryptase inhibitors for asthma, HGF/Met receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction implicated in tumorigenesis, metastasis and tissue repair, BACE1 inhibitors for Alzheimer’s disease, the Hedgehog pathway of developmental biology and cancer, molecular diversity scaffolds by phage display, improved versions of DNase I with increased enzymatic activity for CF and other diseases, exosite inhibitors of coagulation Factor VIIa as protease inhibitors and anticoagulants, Kunitz domains as scaffolds for protease inhibition, GPIIb-IIIa integrin antagonists from snake venoms and leeches as platelet aggregation inhibitors and microbial pathway engineering for bioconversion of glucose to vitamin C.

A. James Link

A. James Link
Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Princeton University
A. James Link
Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Princeton University
 
About Speaker:

Prof. A. James Link earned a BSE from Princeton University and a PhD from Caltech, both in chemical engineering.  He joined the faculty at Princeton in 2007 and is currently an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and molecular biology.  Trained as a protein engineer, Link’s research focus in recent years has been on ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), a diverse and rapidly growing class of natural products. 

Maurizio Pellecchia

Maurizio Pellecchia
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
University of California, Riverside
Maurizio Pellecchia
Professor of Biomedical Sciences
University of California, Riverside
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Pellecchia is a chemical biologist with a strong background in pharmaceutical chemistry, biophysics and translational medicine. He trained at the University of Naples (Italy) where he obtained a MS in Organic Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences, at the ETH-Zurich (working with 2002 Nobel Laureate Prof. Dr. Kurt Wüthrich) and the University of Michigan. Prior to his recruitment in 2002 at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research as Associate Professor, he spent a few years in the pharmaceutical industry. He has served on the faculty of the now Sanford Burnham Prebys medical Discovery Institute for 14 years where he also served as the Associate Director for Translational Research for the Institute’s NCI designated Cancer Center.

Since 2015 he is a Professor of Biomedical Sciences at the University of California at Riverside, School of Medicine and I hold the Daniel Hays endowed Chair in Cancer Research. In addition is the Director of the Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine at UCR. His research is at the forefront of academic drug discovery andchemical biology initiatives. His goals are to support target identification and validation studies in oncology, neurodegenerative, and infectious diseases. The laboratory focuses primarily on the development of innovative pharmacological agents and subsequently apply such agents in target validation studies using cellular and animal models, both internally and via collaborations. Central to these activities are the developing and the application of novel methods and strategies to drug discovery and translational medicine.

Steven Wagner

Steven Wagner
Associate Professor, Neuroscience
University of California San Diego
Steven Wagner
Associate Professor, Neuroscience
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Steven Wagner PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD. He has spent over 25 years in the biopharmaceutical industry, and more recently in academia studying translational neuroscience of age-related neurodegenerative disorders with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). He led the team that discovered the first non-NSAID-like and truly “Notch-sparing” gamma-secretase modulators and introduced the term “gamma-secretase modulators” (GSMs) in 2005 through the discovery of a novel series of diaryl-2-aminothiazole derivatives that are over 5000-fold more potent at lowering A42 levels than the NSAID-like “substrate-targeted” gamma-secretase modulators, e.g., tarenflurbil. His team also, for the first time, purified to homogeneity the gamma-secretase enzyme complex that is ultimately responsible for generating amyloid β(Aβ) plaques, the diagnostic hallmark of AD. Since moving back to academia, into the Department of Neurosciences at UCSD in June of 2009, his laboratory, in addition to designing/discovering another novel and structurally distinct GSM chemotype, was awarded a Blueprint Neurotherapeutics U01 by NIH/NINDS (one of only seven issued in all of Neurology) to optimize and develop GSMs for the treatment and/or prevention of AD. He is also a member of the NIH Drug Discovery SBIR (ETTN-M)ETTN IRG, Division of Neuroscience, Development and Aging Study Section, a member of the NINDS Special Emphasis Panel for the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network, as well as a member of the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund (CAF) Research Consortium and the Scientific Advisory Board for the Alzheimer’s Association’s Collaboration for Cure (C4C).

Protein Kinases in Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Jose Duca

Jose Duca
Head, Computer-Aided Drug Discovery
Novartis
Jose Duca
Head, Computer-Aided Drug Discovery
Novartis
 
About Speaker:

José is Global Head of Computer Aided Drug Discovery (CADD), part of Global Discovery Chemistry at the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR).

José joined Novartis in 2010. Previously, he had been with the Schering-Plough Research Institute and Merck Research Laboratories in Kenilworth, NJ, USA for 10 years where he had increasing responsibilities in the CADD group. His scientific fields of expertise within computational chemistry comprise molecular thinking, modeling, ab initio calculations, molecular recognition, QM-MM methods, solvation and structure-based drug design. José is passionate about drug discovery.

He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the National University of Córdoba, Argentina. He joined Prof. Tony Hopfinger’s group in the College of Pharmacy at the University of Illinois at Chicago as a Postdoctoral Fellow.

Doriano Fabbro

Doriano Fabbro
CSO
PIQUR Therapeutics
Doriano Fabbro
CSO
PIQUR Therapeutics
 
About Speaker:

Doriano Fabbro, Chief Scientific Officer of PIQUR Therapeutics AG, received his Ph.D. in cell biology and biochemistry at the University of Basel, where he worked afterwards for 12 years as Group Leader in Molecular Tumor Biology. In 1991, he joined the Oncology Group of Ciba-Geigy Basel. After the merger of Ciba-Geigy with Sandoz in 1996 he served at Novartis as Head of Kinase Biology until 2012. Doriano has contributed to the discovery and development of various protein kinase inhibitors for the treatment of cancer; e.g. Midostaurin®, Glivec®, Afinitor®, and Tasigna®. Doriano is author in more than 200 publications and numerous patents in the area of protein kinases regulation, structure, screening and drug discovery. He has been honored with the Novartis Oncology President’s Award (2005).

Nicholas Levinson

Nicholas Levinson
Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology
University of Minnesota
Nicholas Levinson
Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology
University of Minnesota
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Levinson obtained his Ph.D. in 2008 from the University of California, Berkeley, where he studied the structural biology of the tyrosine kinases Abl, Src and Csk. He pursued postdoctoral training at Stanford University in biophysical chemistry and worked on the application of vibrational spectroscopy to biological systems. In 2014, Dr. Levinson was appointed Assistant Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His lab studies the biophysical basis of allosteric regulation in the protein kinases using diverse spectroscopic methods including vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance.

Lars Neumann

Lars Neumann
Assays, Biophysics & Screening
Proteros Biostructures
Lars Neumann
Assays, Biophysics & Screening
Proteros Biostructures
 
About Speaker:

2008-current: Head of Assays, Biophysics & Screening at Proteros Biostructures 2005-2008: Group Leader Assay Development & Screening at GPC Biotech 2002-2005: Senior Scientist Assay Development & Screening at Axxima Pharmaceuticals 2000-2005: Postdoc at Stanford University in the laboratory of Brian Kobilka (biophysics on GPCRs) 1996-2000: Ph.D. thesis at Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry 1991-1996: Programm of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Munich.

Alexandra Newton

Alexandra Newton
Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology
UC San Diego
Alexandra Newton
Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology
UC San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Alexandra Newton received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Stanford University in working on membrane biochemistry. She then spent 2 years doing postdoctoral research in Daniel E. Koshland's laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley where she was first introduced to protein kinase C. She was on the faculty in the Chemistry Department at Indiana University, before joining the Department of Pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, where she is now Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology. Her research investigates the cell signaling mechanisms involving protein kinase C and the phosphatase PHLPP.

Nathaniel	Szewczyk

Nate Szewczyk
Professor, School of Medicine
University of Nottingham
Nate Szewczyk
Professor, School of Medicine
University of Nottingham
 
About Speaker:

Nathaniel Szewczyk is a Professor of Space Biology at the University of Nottingham. His general research focus is on muscle biology where he uses a combination of cultured cells, C. elegans, rodents, and human volunteers to understand the genetic and environmental control of muscle homeostasis. His work has been funded by national funders in Japan (JAXA), the UK (UK Space Agency, BBSRC, MRC), and the US (NASA, NIH). He has successfully completed 11 experiments on-board the International Space Station using model systems and is currently studying the molecular basis of, and interventions to prevent, muscle loss with age in both C. elegans and human volunteers. He is an investigator in the Medical Research Council/Arthritis Research UK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research, the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine, and the National Institute of Health Research Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. He is in charge of the molecular medicine curriculum for the University of Nottingham’s Graduate Entry Medicine medical degree course, currently serves as a panel member for the Italian Ministry of Health’s Muscle Study Section, and is the chair of the European Space Agency’s Ageing Topical Team.

Gianluigi Veglia

Gianluigi Veglia
Professor, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics
University of Minnesota
Gianluigi Veglia
Professor, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics
University of Minnesota
 
About Speaker:

Gianluigi Veglia received his master degree in Chemistry from the University of Rome, La Sapienza, with a thesis on the “Synthesis and NMR Characterization of New b-Carboline Derivatives” under the direction of Profs. M. R. Del Giudice and M. Delfini.  In 2004, under the supervision of Prof. M. Delfini at the University of Rome, La Sapienza, he received a Ph.D. degree in Physical Chemistry, with a thesis on “Macromolecular Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy”. He also collaborated with Prof. A. Di Nola focusing on the characterization of conformational motions in small polypeptides using molecular dynamics simulations techniques. For several years, Dr. Veglia was a postdoctoral associate in the laboratory of Prof. S. Opella in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania, where he optimized solution NMR methods for the structure determination of membrane proteins. In 2000, he joined the Department of Chemistry at the University of Minnesota as an Assistant Professor, where he focused on the structural and dynamic characterization of soluble and membrane-bound proteins involved in skeletal and cardiac muscle contractility. In 2006, he was promoted to Associate Professor with a joint appointment between the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics. In 2009, Dr. Veglia was promoted to full Professor. Currently, Dr. Veglia uses an interdisciplinary approach to correlate the structure and dynamics of integral and peripheral membrane proteins with their biological function. Specifically, he combines biochemical assays with solution and solid-state NMR, and computational methods to place the high-resolution structures and conformational dynamics of proteins and protein complexes in the context of their biological function and disease associations. More details about Dr. Veglia’s research projects can be found at http://veglia.chem.umn.edu/.

Gennady Verkhivker

Gennady Verkhivker
Professor, Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine
Schmid College of Science & Technology, Chapman University
Gennady Verkhivker
Professor, Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine
Schmid College of Science & Technology, Chapman University
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Verkhivker is currently Professor of Computational Biosciences and Translational Medicine at Chapman University and Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Department of Pharmacology, UC San Diego. He received his PhD in Physical Chemistry from Moscow University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in computational biophysics from University of Illinois at Chicago in 1992. Dr. Verkhivker was one of the founding scientists at Agouron Pharmaceuticals Inc, in early 1990s and played a leading role in establishing computer-aided structure-based design technology. In 1993-2006, Dr. Verkhivker has held various research and management positions at Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Warner- Lambert, Pfizer Global Research and Development, La Jolla Laboratories. Since 2002, he has been Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UC San Diego. In 2006, he joined School of Pharmacy and Center for Bioinformatics, The University of Kansas as a Full Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Bioinformatics. In 2011 Dr. Verkhivker assumed position of Full Professor of Computational Biosciences & Translational Medicine at Schmid College of Science & Technology and Professor at the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chapman University School of Pharmacy. Dr. Verkhivker authored more than 150 peer reviewed publications and is recognized for his research contributions in the fields of translational bioinformatics, computational biophysics and structure-based drug discovery of molecularly targeted and personalized anti-cancer agents. His most recent research activities are in the areas of computational systems biology, translational bioinformatics and systems pharmacology with the focus on integration of computational and experimental systems biology approaches in translational research.

Ubiquitin Research and Drug Discovery
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Jason Brown

Jason Brown
Scientific Director
Ubiquigent
Jason Brown
Scientific Director
Ubiquigent
 
About Speaker:

Jason co-founded Ubiquigent in 2009 in collaboration with the University of Dundee, the Medical Research Council and Stemgent Inc.  Before starting Ubiquigent he was part of a biotech investment and operations group and involved in supporting a molecular diagnostics, kinase drug discovery and various other drug discovery-focused service companies as well as evaluating investment opportunities. Prior to this he built and ran a kinase-focused assay development and drug discovery service facility for Upstate Biotechnology, a leading provider of cell signalling research products and services.  Jason received his MPhil and DPhil from the University of Cambridge in association with Parke-Davis/Warner-Lambert (Pfizer), during which he identified a voltage-dependent calcium channel subunit as the molecular target of the blockbuster epilepsy and neuropathic pain drugs Neurontin and Lyrica.  After his DPhil Jason worked in and subsequently ran an assay development group for Parke-Davis.

Ubiquigent provides access to the necessary expertise, chemistry (recently launching DUBtarget™-001, a deubiquitylase targeted hit-finding library), high quality research tools and integrated and collaborative drug discovery services required to support its commercial and academic partners in pursuing ubiquitin system-focused drug discovery programmes, and in undertaking basic research.

Yuan Chen

Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
Yuan Chen
Professor of Molecular Medicine
Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope
 
About Speaker:

Yuan Chen, Ph.D., is currently Professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope. She obtained B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China, and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Rutgers University. After postdoctoral studies at the Scripps Research Institute, she joined Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope as tenure-track faculty in 1994. Her laboratory has made major contributions in elucidating the mechanism and regulation of the SUMOylation enzymes and discovered the SUMO-interacting motif that mediates most SUMO-dependent cellular functions. Her current research interests center on the mechanism and inhibition of enzymes in ubiquitin-like modifications and the role of ubiquitin-like modifications in major oncogenesis pathways.

David Hewings

David Hewings
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Genentech
David Hewings
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Genentech
 
About Speaker:

David Hewings received his undergraduate degree in Chemistry and doctorate in Organic Chemistry from the University of Oxford. At Genentech he is developing new chemoproteomic methods to study deubiquitinase activity, in collaboration with Stanford University.

Rusty Lipford

Rusty Lipford
Principal Scientist
Amgen
Rusty Lipford
Principal Scientist
Amgen
 
About Speaker:

- PhD at MIT with Steve Bell (1996-2000) - Postdoctoral studies with Ray Deshaies at Caltech (2001 -2005) - Amgen Oncology Discover Research (2006 - present) (Scientist 2006 - 2009) (Senior Scientist 2009 - 2012) (Principal Scientist (2012 - present)

Matthew Petroski

Matthew Petroski
Associate Professor
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Matthew Petroski
Associate Professor
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Matthew Petroski is an Associate Professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla, California, USA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine and did post-doctoral training at Caltech. His research program focuses on ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like protein signaling and their roles in diseases such as cancer.

Ryan Potts

Ryan Potts
Associate Member, Cell & Molecular Biology Department
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Ryan Potts
Associate Member, Cell & Molecular Biology Department
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
 
About Speaker:

Ryan Potts obtained his B.S. in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2000, and his Ph.D. in Cell Regulation from the UT Southwestern Medical Center in 2007. He then did his postdoctoral research at UT Southwestern Medical Center in the Department of Biochemistry as a Sara and Frank McKnight Independent Postdoctoral Fellow (2008-2011). In September 2011, Dr. Potts joined the Department of Physiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center as a tenure-track Assistant Professor. In January 2016, he moved to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as Associate Professor in the department of Cell and Molecular Biology. His scientific interest is in delineating the functions of the MAGE family of E3 ubiquitin ligase regulators.

Steven I. Reed

Steven I. Reed
Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
Steven I. Reed
Professor, Cell and Molecular Biology
The Scripps Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Steven Reed, Ph.D. is Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla. He received an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Stanford University. Dr. Reed carried out postdoctoral research with Nobel laureate Leland Hartwell at the University of Washington and held a faculty position at the University of California, Santa Barbara prior to assuming his current position. He is known for his pioneering work on the roles and regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases in cell cycle control and oncogenesis. More recently he and his wife, Susanna Ekholm-Reed, discovered a novel pathway linking the ubiquitin ligase parkin directly to neuronal survival, leading to identification of a potential therapeutic target for treating Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Reed is a founder of NeuroMantis Pharmaceuticals, a company dedicated to developing therapeutics targeting neuronal cell death in neurodegenerative disease and other pathological conditions.

Domagoj Vucic

Domagoj Vucic
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
Domagoj Vucic
Principal Scientist, Early Discovery Biochemistry
Genentech
 
About Speaker:

Domagoj Vucic, PhD, is a Principal Scientist at Genentech in South San Francisco, USA. He obtained B.S. from the University of Zagreb, Croatia, and Ph.D. from the University of Georgia, USA. He completed postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Vishva Dixit. Domagoj’s laboratory investigates the biological role of modulators of signaling pathways mediated by ubiquitination, and their involvement in cellular processes triggered by TNF family ligands and other pro-inflammatory stimuli. At Genentech, he leads an effort to develop compounds for blocking uncontrolled inflammatory responses and/or enhancement of the survival of damaged cells and tissues.