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ImmunoTX Summit

2017-11-192017-12-162017-10-31
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Day 1 - Tuesday, January 30th, 2018
7:30
Continental Breakfast & Registration
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8:15
Opening Remarks
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10:20
Morning Networking Break
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Cytokines & Inflammation
Metabolic Regulation of Immunity & Inflammation

11:05
Metabolism of Lupus T cells
 
Laurence  Morel
Laurence Morel
Mary and Ryan Whisenant Family Professor of Pathology
University of Florida
About Speaker: Laurence Morel obtained her PhD from the University of Aix-Marseille (France). She trained as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Ward Wakeland at the University of Florida (USA) in immunogenetics, where she started to work on the genetic basis of lupus i... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Laurence  Morel
Laurence Morel
Mary and Ryan Whisenant Family Professor of Pathology
University of Florida
 
About Speaker:

Laurence Morel obtained her PhD from the University of Aix-Marseille (France). She trained as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Ward Wakeland at the University of Florida (USA) in immunogenetics, where she started to work on the genetic basis of lupus in mouse models. She was appointed with a faculty position in the department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine at UF in 1999, where she is currently a tenured professor and the Vice Chair for Research and Academic Affairs. Her research focuses on the mechanisms of lupus pathogenesis using mouse models as well as patients’ samples. In addition to genetic studies, her studies now extend to immune metabolism, the role of the microbiome, and the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lupus pathogenesis. Her long-term goal is to identify genes and pathways responsible for lupus susceptibility, to characterize their contribution to autoimmune immunopathology, and to translate these findings into therapeutic targets.

 
Abstract: Autoreactive CD4 T cells are key effe...Read More 

Autoreactive CD4 T cells are key effectors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). It is hypothesized that 1) SLE T cells have metabolic defects that impair their functions; 2) Targeting CD4 T cell metabolism may abrogate CD4 T cell inflammatory functions and reduce disease symptoms in SLE mice and in CD4 T cells from SLE patients. CD4 T cells from lupus mice and patients have a significantly higher metabolism as well as an enhanced mTOR activity as compared to controls. In vitro, both metformin, which inhibits mitochondrial complex I and activates AMPK, and 2-DG, a glucose inhibitor, blocked IFNγ production and metformin increased IL-2 production. In vivo, a combined treatment with metformin and 2-DG, normalized T cell metabolism and reversed disease phenotypes in four lupus mouse models. Remarkably, the number of TFH cells, which correlates with disease severity in patients, was normalized by the combination treatment in every model. Further, excessive IFNγ production by CD4 T cells from SLE patients was also normalized by metformin. In addition, we have evidence in the mouse that treatment with metabolic inhibitors do not impair T cell dependent humoral responses or protection against a viral infection.

In conclusion, the combination of a glucose inhibitor with metformin restores T cell function and reverses disease across diverse mouse models of SLE, without global immunosuppression, and metformin treatment normalizes the function of T cells from SLE patients. We propose that T cell metabolism may serve as a biomarker of disease activity and provides a novel target for immune intervention in SLE.

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Immunotherapeutics & Immunomonitoring
Novel Targets for Immunotherapy

11:05
Driving CD8+ T Cell Responses to Mutational Neoantigens in Tumors – Harnessing Immunogenic Viral Vectors
 
Karin Jooss
Karin Jooss
Executive Vice President of Research & Chief Scientific Officer
Gritstone Oncology
About Speaker: Karin Jooss serves as Chief Scientific Officer of Gritstone Oncology. Dr. Jooss joined Gritstone from Pfizer, where she served as head of Cancer Immunotherapeutics within the Vaccine Immunotherapeutics department for seven years. While at Pfizer, s... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Karin Jooss
Karin Jooss
Executive Vice President of Research & Chief Scientific Officer
Gritstone Oncology
 
About Speaker: Karin Jooss serves as Chief Scientific Officer of Gritstone Oncology. Dr. Jooss joined Gritstone from Pfizer, where she served as head of Cancer Immunotherapeutics within the Vaccine Immunotherapeutics department for seven years. While at Pfizer, she built and led immuno-oncology teams, was a member of the Vaccine Immunotherapeutics leadership team and served as the head of the Immunopharmacology team. Her duties included overseeing the assessment of all cancer vaccine in-licensing opportunities, and developing and launching Pfizer’s first clinical cancer vaccine program deploying a variety of vaccine platforms and immune modulators to build a multi-component vaccine-based immunotherapy regimen. Prior to joining Pfizer, Jooss served as vice president of Research at Cell Genesys, Inc. where she oversaw all research activities related to the company’s cancer vaccine and oncolytic virotherapy programs. Dr.Jooss received her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Marburg in Germany and performed postgraduate work in gene therapy and immunology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is on the editorial board of Molecular Therapy and Journal of Gene Medicine and is a member of the immunology and educational committee for the American Society of Gene Therapy as well as the Industry Task Force of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC).
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11:30
 
Xiao Hu
Xiao Hu
Executive Director
Lycera
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Xiao Hu
Xiao Hu
Executive Director
Lycera
 
About Speaker:
11:30
IGN002: A Focused ImmunoTherapeutic (FIT) for NHL
 
Michael  Gresser
Michael Gresser
Chief Scientific Officer
Immungene
About Speaker: Mike Gresser, Ph.D. is Chief Scientific Officer for ImmuneGene. From 2000-2006, Dr. Gresser served as Vice President, Research for Inflammation at Amgen, Inc. Prior to Amgen, he was at the Merck Frosst Center for Therapeutic Research where he rose to... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Michael  Gresser
Michael Gresser
Chief Scientific Officer
Immungene
 
About Speaker:

Mike Gresser, Ph.D. is Chief Scientific Officer for ImmuneGene. From 2000-2006, Dr. Gresser served as Vice President, Research for Inflammation at Amgen, Inc. Prior to Amgen, he was at the Merck Frosst Center for Therapeutic Research where he rose to be Executive Director of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He received his Ph.D in Biochemistry from Brandeis University and did postdoctoral studies at UCLA. Before joining Merck Frosst in 1988 he was Pr ofessor of Chemistry at Simon Frazer University in Burnaby, British Columbia.

 
Abstract: Interferon alpha (IFNα) has bee...Read More 

Interferon alpha (IFNα) has been reported to provide a survival benefit when administered systemically to patients with various types of cancer. Its use has been limited by its safety profile. The Company’s IGN002 molecule was designed to improve both safety and efficacy of IFNα in lymphoma by targeting it to CD20-expressing cancer cells. IGN002 is a fusion protein consisting of an anti-CD20 antibody linked to IFNα-2b. This results in minimizing the exposure of IFNα-2b to non-cancer cells, which accounts for the well-known dose-limiting toxic effects of conventional IFNα. IGN002 is much more potent than IFNα-2b on cells that express CD20, and much less potent than IFNα-2b on cells that do not express CD20. This pattern of relative activities has been found in assays measuring inhibition of proliferation, viral protection, and STAT1 phosphorylation. We believe that this will translate to a broad therapeutic window in cancer patients. IGN002 is thus far well-tolerated by patients, who have experienced no adverse effects more severe than transient grades 1 and 2 infusion-related reactions (IRR), at much higher IFN exposures than those that result in dose-limiting toxicities in the case of IFNα-2b. IGN002 is one example from ImmunGene’s portfolio of focused interferon therapeutics (FIT), which are antibody-IFNα fusion proteins suitable for treatment of various types of cancer. Each of our FIT agents uses an antibody against a tumor associated antigen (TAA) to focus and amplify the effect of IFNα2b on cancer cells and attenuate its effect on healthy cells.

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11:55
 
John  Eid
John Eid
Chief Scientific Officer and Co-Founder
Whole Biome
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
John  Eid
John Eid
Chief Scientific Officer and Co-Founder
Whole Biome
 
About Speaker:
11:55
Multivalent Adoptive Cell Therapy Using Novel XPRESIDENT® Derived Targets
 
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
About Speaker: Dr Walter joined Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH in 2005 where he became VP Immunology. For over 15 years he has been active in the field of cancer immunotherapy and a leader in human T-cell biology. In addition to supporting the development of the XPR... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
 
About Speaker:

Dr Walter joined Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH in 2005 where he became VP Immunology. For over 15 years he has been active in the field of cancer immunotherapy and a leader in human T-cell biology. In addition to supporting the development of the XPRESIDENT® technology platform, under his leadership, Immatics developed its powerful Immunomonitoring and T-cell receptor (TCR) discovery platforms to support the generation of safe and effective T-cell-based therapeutic modalities. In 2015, Dr Walter co-founded Immatics US, Inc. in Houston, Texas as a joint venture between Immatics and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) to develop next-generation adoptive cell therapies (ACT). He contributed significantly to raising the necessary funding including a $20m CPRIT grant by the State of Texas. As CSO, at Immatics US he leads a team that is responsible for Product Science, Process Development, Manufacturing, Quality Control and Program Management for Immatics’ cell therapy programs. Dr Walter is an inventor on numerous patents and patent applications and has co-authored more than 30 publications in prestigious peer-reviewed journals including Nature Medicine, Cell Reports, Brain and Blood. Dr Walter gained his PhD in Immunology from the University of Tuebingen, Germany.

 
Abstract: Tumor evasion due to tumor heterogene...Read More 

Tumor evasion due to tumor heterogeneity or antigen loss is a major limitation for the successful treatment of solid tumors using adoptive T cell therapy. Multivalent approaches using multiple relevant targets in parallel should be a solution to this problem, however they have been conducted in only very limited way due to lack of safe and validated targets. The XPRESIDENT® platform allows access to a novel target space using a combination of ultra-sensitive quantitative mass spectrometry, transcriptomics, immunology and bioinformatics based on the immunopeptidome of human normal and tumor tissues. We present data from one clinical-stage platform (ACTolog®) using up to four validated targets per patient and provide an update to a complementary, genetically engineered approach, ACTengine®.

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12:20
 
Howard Spiegel
Howard Spiegel
Simple Plex Specialist
Protein Simple, A Division of Bio-Techne
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Howard Spiegel
Howard Spiegel
Simple Plex Specialist
Protein Simple, A Division of Bio-Techne
 
About Speaker:
12:20
Combined Inhibition of IDO1 and PD-1 as an Effective Therapeutic Strategy in Cancer
 
Peggy Scherle
Peggy Scherle
Group Vice President of Discovery
Incyte
About Speaker: Peggy received her Ph.D. in immunology from the University of Pennsylvania and completed her postdoctoral training at the NIH. Prior to joining Incyte in 2002, Peggy held scientific research positions with DuPont Pharmaceuticals Company and Bristol-M... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Peggy Scherle
Peggy Scherle
Group Vice President of Discovery
Incyte
 
About Speaker:

Peggy received her Ph.D. in immunology from the University of Pennsylvania and completed her postdoctoral training at the NIH. Prior to joining Incyte in 2002, Peggy held scientific research positions with DuPont Pharmaceuticals Company and Bristol-Myers Squibb. At Incyte, Peggy has been involved in target validation and drug discovery efforts within the therapeutic areas of inflammation and oncology. Her efforts have focused on the identification and preclinical characterization of small molecule inhibitors of key proteins involved in cell signaling and immune cell function.

 
Abstract: Antibodies to checkpoint receptors ha...Read More 

Antibodies to checkpoint receptors have demonstrated unprecedented efficacy in a broad range of tumors types and represent a new paradigm in cancer treatment focused on inhibition of mechanisms that suppress anti-tumoral immunity. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) has also emerged as an immunotherapy target due to its role in regulating T-cell responses. Preclinical and early clinical data will be described that support the combination of IDO1 inhibition with antibodies to checkpoint receptors.

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12:45
Lunch Session: Immunomonitoring & Novel High Throughput Technologies
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Cytokines & Inflammation
Influence of Microbiome on Immune Responses
Moderator: Laurence Morel; Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
2:15
Regulation of Allergic Responses to Food by Commensal Bacteria
 
Cathryn  Nagler
Cathryn Nagler
Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
The University of Chicago
About Speaker: Cathryn Nagler graduated with honors from Barnard College, Columbia University. She obtained her Ph.D. from the Sackler Institute of Biomedical Science at N.Y.U. School of Medicine and did a postdoctoral fellowship at M.I.T. She was Associate Profess... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Cathryn  Nagler
Cathryn Nagler
Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
The University of Chicago
 
About Speaker:

Cathryn Nagler graduated with honors from Barnard College, Columbia University. She obtained her Ph.D. from the Sackler Institute of Biomedical Science at N.Y.U. School of Medicine and did a postdoctoral fellowship at M.I.T. She was Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology) at Harvard Medical School prior to joining the University of Chicago in 2009. She received the inaugural Bunning Food Allergy Professorship in 2011. Dr. Nagler has participated in numerous review panels for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, NIDDK, NIAID, and Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE). She recently began her second term on FARE’s research advisory board. She has served the American Association of Immunologists (AAI) as Section Editor for the Journal of Immunology, Instructor (Mucosal Immunology) for the Introduction to Immunology course and as member of the Program, Clinical Immunology, Publications and Awards Committees. She is the senior editor for Clinical and Translational Immunology for the AAI’s new journal ImmunoHorizons. She has also served as an elected Councilor of the Society for Mucosal Immunology and is an Associate Editor of the journal Mucosal Immunology. Dr. Nagler has a long-standing interest in the mechanisms governing tolerance to dietary antigens and the potential immunomodulatory features of the oral route of antigen administration. Her most recent work examines how commensal bacteria regulate susceptibility to allergic responses to food. She has applied insights gained from studying pre-clinical gnotobiotic murine models of cow’s milk allergy to launch a new company, ClostraBio, which is developing microbiome-modulating therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of food allergy.

Immunotherapeutics & Immunomonitoring
Combination Immunotherapy
Moderator: Peggy Scherle; Group Vice President of Discovery
2:15
Antitumor Effects of Combination Immunotherapy
 
Joost Oppenheim
Joost Oppenheim
Senior Investigator
NIH NCI
About Speaker: Dr. Oppenheim pioneered the development of cytokine, chemokine and alarmin fields of research. He is currently studying the role of alarmins that activate toll-like receptors, in inducing immunity to cancer. He has been engaged in translational studi... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Joost Oppenheim
Joost Oppenheim
Senior Investigator
NIH NCI
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Oppenheim pioneered the development of cytokine, chemokine and alarmin fields of research. He is currently studying the role of alarmins that activate toll-like receptors, in inducing immunity to cancer. He has been engaged in translational studies aimed at utilizing alarmins as adjuvants in vaccines for use against infectious agents and tumors. He is also investigating means of blocking the immunosuppressive limb of immunity as exerted by T regulatory cells to augment antitumor immunity. Dr. Oppenheim is the Chief of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation and the Deputy Director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program at the National Cancer Institute which focuses on the effects of inflammation and the immune response on cancer.

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2:40
 
Manoj  Dadlani
Manoj Dadlani
Chief Executive Officer
CosmosID
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Manoj  Dadlani
Manoj Dadlani
Chief Executive Officer
CosmosID
 
About Speaker:
2:40
Combinatorial Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy Using Anti-CD40 Antibody
 
Alexander  Rakhmilevich
Alexander Rakhmilevich
Distinguished Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison
About Speaker: Dr. Rakhmilevich is a distinguished scientist at the University of W isconsin-Madison. He obtained his MD and PhD degrees in Soviet Union. He has been working in the field of cancer immunology since 1985. His current laboratory research involves the ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Alexander  Rakhmilevich
Alexander Rakhmilevich
Distinguished Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Rakhmilevich is a distinguished scientist at the University of W isconsin-Madison. He obtained his MD and PhD degrees in Soviet Union. He has been working in the field of cancer immunology since 1985. His current laboratory research involves the develop ment of cancer immunotherapies using activation of macrophages via CD40 ligation

 
Abstract: CD40 ligation has been shown to induc...Read More 

CD40 ligation has been shown to induce antitumor effects in mice and cancer patients. We have demonstrated in several syngeneic mouse tumor models that anti-CD40 antibody, alone and in synergy with a toll-like receptor 9 agonist, CpG, and toll-receptor 4 agonist, MPL, activates macrophages and induces T cell-independent antitumor effects. T cell-independent antitumor efficacy of anti-CD40 and CpG can be further enhanced by chemotherapy. Anti-CD40 and CpG were synergistic with a T cell activation approach, involving in situ vaccine (intratumoral injections of IL-2 or IL-15 with anti-GD2 antibody) and checkpoint blockade, resulting in regression of a local advanced mouse B78 melanoma and immunological memory.

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3:05
 
Take Ogawa
Take Ogawa
Director, Business Development
Second Genome
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Take Ogawa
Take Ogawa
Director, Business Development
Second Genome
 
About Speaker:
3:05
T-SIGn Oncolytic Viruses: Systemic Delivery for Localized Production of Immunotherapeutic Combinations within Tumors
 
Brian  Champion
Brian Champion
Chief Scientific Officer
PsiOxus Therapeutics
About Speaker: Dr Brian Champion is Chief Scientific Officer and member of the Executive Management Team at PsiOxus Therapeutics Ltd, Oxford, UK where he is leading the scientific team in the development of novel oncolytic virus-based, tumor-specific immunogene the... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Brian  Champion
Brian Champion
Chief Scientific Officer
PsiOxus Therapeutics
 
About Speaker:

Dr Brian Champion is Chief Scientific Officer and member of the Executive Management Team at PsiOxus Therapeutics Ltd, Oxford, UK where he is leading the scientific team in the development of novel oncolytic virus-based, tumor-specific immunogene therapies for the treatment of cancer.   He was previously Executive Director and Head of Immunology for Pfizer's Vaccine Immunotherapeutics Research Unit in La Jolla, California, leading the immunology team providing expertise and immunoassays for Pfizer vaccine projects, program leader for an anti-IgE therapeutic vaccine for allergy/asthma, and a member of the leadership team. Prior to this he was Site Head for Pfizer Vaccine Research in the UK. Before joining Pfizer, Dr Champion was Chief Scientific Officer for Lorantis and Celldex in Cambridge (UK) developing protein and DNA-based, antigen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches to a variety of immunological diseases, including therapeutic vaccines and immunotherapeutic biomolecule approaches for cancer, infectious diseases, allergies and autoimmune disorders. Prior to Lorantis, he was with Glaxo and GlaxoWellcome (UK and USA) for 13 years, focusing primarily on target discovery and validation research for autoimmune, allergic and bone disorders.

 
Abstract: We have developed a broadly applicabl...Read More 

We have developed a broadly applicable platform system, based on the potent chimeric oncolytic adenovirus enadenotucirev (EnAd), for directing the selective localized production of a combination of immunotherapeutic agents within tumors following systemic dosing, while minimizing the potential for systemic off-target effects of such combination approaches. These “tumor-specific immunogene therapy (T-SIGn)”  virus candidates can be designed with a primary transgene (e.g. targeting a specific mechanism) together with 2-3 modulatory transgenes (e.g. encoding immunomodulators) to enhance or fine tune activity within the tumor microenvironment. The presentation will highlight recent data supporting both the platform and specific T-SIGn virus candidates.

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3:30
 
Ling-Yang Hao
Ling-Yang Hao
Principal Scientist
Janssen
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Ling-Yang Hao
Ling-Yang Hao
Principal Scientist
Janssen
 
About Speaker:
3:30
Next Generation Combination Strategies to Enhance CAR Products for Multiple Myeloma
 
Blythe  Sather
Blythe Sather
Senior Research Scientist
Juno Therapeutics
About Speaker: Dr. Blythe Sather received her PhD from the University of Washington, Department of Immunology in 2007. For her thesis, she focused on understanding the role of homing receptors on the function of regulatory T cells in the laboratory of Dr. Danial Ca... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Blythe  Sather
Blythe Sather
Senior Research Scientist
Juno Therapeutics
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Blythe Sather received her PhD from the University of Washington, Department of Immunology in 2007. For her thesis, she focused on understanding the role of homing receptors on the function of regulatory T cells in the laboratory of Dr. Danial Campbell at the Benaroya Research Institute in Seattle. During her postdoctoral work at Seattle Children’s Research Institute in the laboratory of Dr. David Rawlings, she focused on developing lentiviral gene therapies and lead a team who did ground breaking work using megaTAL nucleases to insert chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) via gene editing-mediated homologous recombination into the CCR5 locus of primary T cells for HIV therapy. In 2014, her desire to bring these types of therapies to the clinic on a larger scale lead her to move to Juno Therapeutics to help develop their research division. Since at Juno, she been instrumental in building their CAR T cell development platform, leading the multiple myeloma CAR T cell program, as well leading the collaboration with Editas medicine to bring CRISPER-mediated gene editing to CAR and TCR T cell products.

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3:55
Afternoon Networking Break
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Round Table Sessions
1
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4:40
Round Table 1: The Potential Roles of the Microbiome in a Clinical Setting
Take Ogawa
Take Ogawa
Director, Business Development
Second Genome
 
Take Ogawa
Take Ogawa
Director, Business Development
Second Genome
 
About Speaker:
Round Table 2: The Future of Tolerogenic Therapies for Adverse Immune Responses
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
 
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
 
About Speaker:

David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, University of Chicago (MS) and Yale (PhD). Following a fellowship at Oxford University, he held tenured positions at Duke University, University of Rochester, and University of Maryland Medical School. Dr. Scott has contributed to over 200 research papers on immunologic tolerance, and its application in autoimmune diseases, hemophilia and gene therapy. The author of two textbooks, including The Nature of Immunologic Tolerance, he ia recipient of a number of awards, e.g. Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Immunologists, a Boarhaave Professorship at Leiden University in Holland, and the 2009 Scientific Achievement Award from AAPS.

Round Table 3: Hallmarks of Attractive Cancer Immunotherapy Targets
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
 
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
 
About Speaker:

Dr Walter joined Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH in 2005 where he became VP Immunology. For over 15 years he has been active in the field of cancer immunotherapy and a leader in human T-cell biology. In addition to supporting the development of the XPRESIDENT® technology platform, under his leadership, Immatics developed its powerful Immunomonitoring and T-cell receptor (TCR) discovery platforms to support the generation of safe and effective T-cell-based therapeutic modalities. In 2015, Dr Walter co-founded Immatics US, Inc. in Houston, Texas as a joint venture between Immatics and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) to develop next-generation adoptive cell therapies (ACT). He contributed significantly to raising the necessary funding including a $20m CPRIT grant by the State of Texas. As CSO, at Immatics US he leads a team that is responsible for Product Science, Process Development, Manufacturing, Quality Control and Program Management for Immatics’ cell therapy programs. Dr Walter is an inventor on numerous patents and patent applications and has co-authored more than 30 publications in prestigious peer-reviewed journals including Nature Medicine, Cell Reports, Brain and Blood. Dr Walter gained his PhD in Immunology from the University of Tuebingen, Germany.

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5:40
Networking Reception & Poster Session
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Day - 2 Wednesday, January 31st, 2018
 
7:15
Breakfast with Mentors from Academia & Industry
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Cytokines & Inflammation
Targeting Cytokines for Therapeutic Interventions
Moderator: Stanley Perlman; Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
8:30
 
Dermot  McGovern
Dermot McGovern
Joshua L. and Lisa Z. Greer Chair of Inflammatory Bowel genetics, Professor of Medicine
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Dermot  McGovern
Dermot McGovern
Joshua L. and Lisa Z. Greer Chair of Inflammatory Bowel genetics, Professor of Medicine
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine
 
About Speaker:
Immunogenicity & Immunotoxicity
Molecular Mechanisms & Strategic Modulation of Immunogenicity

8:30
Engineered Specific Regulatory T cells Block Adverse Immune Responses
 
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
About Speaker: David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, University of Chicago (MS) and Yale (PhD). Following a fellowship at Oxford Universit... Read Full Bio 
 
 
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
 
About Speaker:

David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, University of Chicago (MS) and Yale (PhD). Following a fellowship at Oxford University, he held tenured positions at Duke University, University of Rochester, and University of Maryland Medical School. Dr. Scott has contributed to over 200 research papers on immunologic tolerance, and its application in autoimmune diseases, hemophilia and gene therapy. The author of two textbooks, including The Nature of Immunologic Tolerance, he ia recipient of a number of awards, e.g. Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Immunologists, a Boarhaave Professorship at Leiden University in Holland, and the 2009 Scientific Achievement Award from AAPS.

 
Abstract: Our lab has created and expanded huma...Read More 

Our lab has created and expanded human “natural” regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as cytotoxic T cells based on Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) therapy for cancer. These Tregs are rendered specific by expression of either a T-cell receptor (TCR), a single chain Fv (scFv) V region or a novel CAR derivative, called B-cell antibody receptors (BAR). These specific Tregs demonstrate potent suppression of T-cell and B-cell responses in two disease models, MS and hemophilia, in vitro and in vivo. These cells are stable, specific and potent. Our results are a platform to generate T cells that can be used to reduce immunogenicity and block adverse immune responses. Benefits include: * Specific as opposed to non-specific immunosuppression * Platform to reduce immunogenicity in multiple disease states * Ability to remove specific B cells * Reduction of T cell responses in presence of inflammation

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8:55
Targeting IL-17 in Neuroinflammation: More to it Than Meets the Eye
 
Rachel  Caspi
Rachel Caspi
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
NEI, NIH
About Speaker: Dr. Caspi is is a tenured senior investigator, Section Head and Deputy Chief of the Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, NIH. She also holds an Adjunct Professorship at the University of Pennsylvannia Sch. Med. Dr. Caspi's research cente... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Rachel  Caspi
Rachel Caspi
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
NEI, NIH
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Caspi is is a tenured senior investigator, Section Head and Deputy Chief of the Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, NIH. She also holds an Adjunct Professorship at the University of Pennsylvannia Sch. Med. Dr. Caspi's research centers on immunology of the eye. A major direction is tolerance and autoimmunity to immunologically privileged retinal antigens in animal models of autoimmune uveitis, a potentially blinding human disease. She developed the mouse model of uveitis, now in use worldwide. Her studies have elucidated many basic mechanisms of pathogenesis and helped to devise clinically relevant immunotherapeutic approaches. Her recent work emphasizes the effects of the commensal microbiome on anti-retinal autoimmunity as well as on mucosal immunity and host defense at the ocular surface. She serves on journal Editorial Boards and is an organizer of ocular and general immunology conferences. Dr. Caspi is the recipient of the highly prestigious Friedenwald award and the Alcon Research Institute award, and has authored and co-authored over 230 publications. http://www.nei.nih.gov/intramural/imm-reg.asp

8:55
 
Albert Wong
Albert J Wong
Professor, Cancer Biology Program, Neurosurgery
Stanford University Medical Center
About Speaker: Dr. Wong received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the Hopkins Oncology Center under Dr. Bert Vogelstein and then held faculty positions at the Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Thomas Jefferson Un... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Albert Wong
Albert J Wong
Professor, Cancer Biology Program, Neurosurgery
Stanford University Medical Center
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Wong received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the Hopkins Oncology Center under Dr. Bert Vogelstein and then held faculty positions at the Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Thomas Jefferson University before joining the Cancer Biology Program and the Dept. of Neurosurgery at Stanford University in 2005. Focusing on the causes and immunotherapy of human brain tumors, Dr. Wong has made several key discoveries, including the identification of the EGFRvIII alteration and the Gab1 signaling molecule. He showed that EGFRvIII can be used as a vaccine to treat brain tumors, which has led to several clinical trials. This led him to found the biotech company Alteris Therapeutics and as its President led its successful acquisition by Celldex Therapeutics. He has served on numerous review committees for the NIH and ACS, has been an advisor to several universities and pharmaceutical companies, and has been recognized with several honors, including Who’s Who in America, and finalist for regional Biotech Company of the Year.

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9:20
 
Thomas  Schall
Thomas Schall
President and Chief Executive Officer
ChemoCentryx
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Thomas  Schall
Thomas Schall
President and Chief Executive Officer
ChemoCentryx
 
About Speaker:
9:20
Mitigation of Immunogenicity with Tolerogenic Nanoparticles
 
Kei Kishimoto
Kei Kishimoto
Chief Scientific Officer
Selecta Biosciences
About Speaker: Dr. Kishimoto is the Chief Scientific Officer of Selecta Biosciences, a biotechnology company developing synthetic vaccines b ased on a novel self-assembling nanoparticle technology. Prior to joining Selecta, Dr. Kishimoto was Vice President of Resea... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Kei Kishimoto
Kei Kishimoto
Chief Scientific Officer
Selecta Biosciences
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Kishimoto is the Chief Scientific Officer of Selecta Biosciences, a biotechnology company developing synthetic vaccines b ased on a novel self-assembling nanoparticle technology. Prior to joining Selecta, Dr. Kishimoto was Vice President of Research at Momenta Pharmaceuticals where he led multidisciplinary teams in inflammation, oncology, and cardiovascular disease. Previously he was Senior Director of Inflammation Research at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, where he provid ed the scientific leadership for four programs in clinical development, and an Associate Director of Immunology at Boehringer Ingelheim. Dr. Kishimoto receive d his doctoral degree in Immunology from Harvard University and his post-doctoral training at Stanford University.

 
Abstract: The context in which dendritic cells ...Read More 

The context in which dendritic cells encounter antigen can determine the outcome of the immune response. Conventional vaccines provide antigen in the context of an adjuvant to stimulate antigen-specific immune responses. We have recently engineered nanoparticles to present antigen in the context of a tolerogenic signal provided by rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. These self-assembling, biodegradable synthetic vaccine particles containing rapamycin (SVP-Rapamycin) together with either co-encapsulated antigen or admixed with free antigen inhibit the activation of antigen-specific T cells and B cells through the induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells in vivo. Tolerance induction is dependent on the encapsulation of rapamycin, as free rapamycin is ineffective. We have demonstrated therapeutic protection as well as adoptive transfer of tolerance in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We have also applied the use of these SVP-Rapamycin to prevent the formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) to biologic therapies. The development of ADAs is a common cause for treatment failure and adverse events, such as hypersensitivity reactions, associated with biologic therapies. We have demonstrated the functional benefit of immune tolerance induction with a variety of biologic drugs, including coagulation factor VIII in a model of hemophilia A, anti-TNF monoclonal antibody in a model of spontaneous arthritis, pegylated uricase in uricase deficient mice and in nonhuman primates, immunotoxins in a model of mesothelioma, and adeno-associated vectors used in gene therapy. Currently a pegylated uricase enzyme in combination with SVP-Rapamycin is being evaluated in a multi-center Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with symptomatic gout and hyperuricemia. Initial data from the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trials will be presented.

 Read Less
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9:45
Emerging Therapies for Atopic Dermatitis
 
Michael  Howell
Michael Howell
Senior Director of Translational Sciences
Incyte Corporation
About Speaker: Michael Howell currently works as the Senior Director of Translational Research at the Incyte Corporation with a focus on immunological diseases. Dr. Howell received his PhD in Immunology from the West Virginia University School of Medicine and then ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Michael  Howell
Michael Howell
Senior Director of Translational Sciences
Incyte Corporation
 
About Speaker:

Michael Howell currently works as the Senior Director of Translational Research at the Incyte Corporation with a focus on immunological diseases. Dr. Howell received his PhD in Immunology from the West Virginia University School of Medicine and then moved onto National Jewish Medical and Research Center where he transitioned from a post doctoral fellow to Assistant Professor in the Division of Allergy and Immunology. While at NJMRC, he served as a Co-Investigator for the Atopic Dermatitis Vaccinia Network and made seminal discoveries in the role of Th2 cytokines on the barrier and innate immune responses of atopic dermatitis patients. Since transitioning to industry, Dr. Howell has held positions at Boehringer Ingelheim, the Immune Tolerance Network, MedImmune, and Incyte. Throughout his career, Dr. Howell has combined clinical and basic science approaches to evaluate inflammatory diseases. This research has been highlighted in national and international meetings, peer-reviewed publications and reviews on immunologic mechanisms and has led to recent patent applications for therapeutic interventions and biomarker strategies in inflammatory diseases.

9:45
 
Annie  De Groot
Annie De Groot
Founder, CEO & CSO
Epivax, Inc.
About Speaker: Annie De Groot is a Smith College graduate (Class of 1978) and medical doctor trained at the University of Chicago (Pritzker School of Medicine, 1983). She trained in Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease at New England Medical Center, and was a r... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Annie  De Groot
Annie De Groot
Founder, CEO & CSO
Epivax, Inc.
 
About Speaker:

Annie De Groot is a Smith College graduate (Class of 1978) and medical doctor trained at the University of Chicago (Pritzker School of Medicine, 1983). She trained in Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease at New England Medical Center, and was a research fellow at the NIH (1986-1989). She has both laboratory bench (NIH) and field (former Zaire, the Gambia, and Mali) experience in vaccine research and vaccination campaigns. Having experienced both the beauty of discovery in bench research and the thrill of improving patient lives in her field and clinical work, she has worked to expand the engagement of bench scientists in clinical work and vice versa, whenever possible.

Following her Infectious Disease Fellowship (NEMC), she became a faculty member at Brown University in 1993, where she began to develop the cutting edge computational vaccine design tools for which she is well known. She licensed the first versions of these tools to EpiVax, Inc. in 1998, formed the company with two partners, and has served as CEO/CSO and President of the company since its inception. With Bill Martin cofounder, she has succeeded in establishing EpiVax as a leading company in the field of immunoinformatics, working with a range of global clients and partners to improve the design of vaccines and biologics and improving human health everywhere.

De Groot moved her academic affiliation from Brown University to University of Rhode Island in 2009. De Groot became Director of the Institute for Immunology and Informatics and was subsequently awarded $13M in funding from the NIH to develop the ‘iCubed’ as a center of excellence in Computational Vaccinology. She is the author more than 190 peer-reviewed publications in the fields of computational vaccinology, biodefense, personalized vaccines, and immunology.

Since 2016, she and her business partner Bill Martin have been working to establish a new subsidiary of EpiVax, tentatively called Ancer, that will focus on the emerging field of immune-oncology. Ancer will develop personalized cancer vaccines based on the patients’ own tumor genome. Should De Groot succeed in translating these concepts to the clinic, she will have realized her lifelong dream, which is to make vaccines that are tailored to the individual, highly efficient, safe, and accessible worldwide. She has won numerous awards, including the Smith Medal in 2013, was recognized as one of the 50 most influential people in vaccinology in 2014 and named Vaccine company CEO of the year in 2016.

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10:10
Morning Networking Break
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Cytokines & Inflammation
Innate Immunity in Respiratory Diseases
Moderator: Michael Howell; Senior Director of Translational Sciences
10:40
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Insights into Role of Type 1 Interferon
 
Stanley  Perlman
Stanley Perlman
Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
University of Iowa
About Speaker: Dr. Perlman currently investigates the pathogenesis of coronavirus-mediated severe human respiratory disease (severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and of coronavirus-induced demyelination. His labor... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Stanley  Perlman
Stanley Perlman
Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
University of Iowa
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Perlman currently investigates the pathogenesis of coronavirus-mediated severe human respiratory disease (severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and of coronavirus-induced demyelination. His laboratory also has a strong interest in the regulatory T cells in the context of infection. He has developed severe animal models for the study of MERS and has also investigated T cell responses in MERS survivors. Prior to joining the faculty of the University of Iowa in 1983, he obtained his Ph.D. at M.I.T. and his M.D. at the University of Miami.

 
Abstract: Highly pathogenic human respiratory c...Read More 

Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses (CoV) cause acute lethal disease characterized by an exuberant inflammatory response and severe lung damage. However, the precise factors that lead to lung pathology are not well understood. Here, we used mice infected with the coronavirus that causes the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). In order to study these mice, we developed several infection systems in which receptor is provided exogenously because mice are naturally resistant to infection with MERS-CoV. Using mice in which the human receptor replaces the mouse receptor (hDDP4 replaces mDPP4, hDPP4-KI mice) and virus adapted to cause severe disease in these mice, we show that Type I interferon (IFN-I) is required for protection and for virus clearance. This is in marked contrast to mice infected with another highly pathogenic respiratory human coronavirus, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), where disease is ameliorated in mice in the absence of IFN-I. In these mice, IFN-I expression was delayed compared to the kinetics of virus replication. Delayed IFN-I signaling promoted the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages, which caused an elevation in lung cytokine/chemokine levels, extensive vascular leakage and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Early IFN-I protected SARS-CoV-infected mice from severe disease. In contrast, IFN and virus titers reached peak titers at the same time after infection. These results demonstrate the importance of timing of endogenous IFN-I expression relative to virus replication, in terms of outcomes. Exogenously delivered IFN-I has had mixed effects when administered to MERS patients therapeutically. Our results may explain some of this variability, indicating that timing of IFN-I administration must be carefully considered relative to the disease course and kinetics of virus replication. Benefits of this presentation: 1. To understand the pathogenesis of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. 2. To gain insight into the various murine models used for the study of pathogenic human coronaviruses. 3. To understand some of the differences between the infections caused by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. 4. To understand the relationship between virus replication and endogenously produced or exogenously administered IFN-I and how this differs in the context of SARS versus MERS.

 Read Less
Immunogenicity & Immunotoxicity
Immunogenicity Assessment of Novel Drug Candidates & Biosimilars

10:40
Challenges and Solutions in Immunogenicity Assessment of Novel Drug Candidates
 
Meina  Liang
Meina Liang
Director, Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis
MedImmune
About Speaker: Dr. Meina Liang has broad experiences in drug development of small molecule and biologics across therapeutic areas, including antibody-drug conjugate and immunotherapy. Dr. Liang is currently director of Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis at Medimmu... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Meina  Liang
Meina Liang
Director, Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis
MedImmune
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Meina Liang has broad experiences in drug development of small molecule and biologics across therapeutic areas, including antibody-drug conjugate and immunotherapy. Dr. Liang is currently director of Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis at Medimmune, a subsidiary of AstraZeneca. She leads a centralized functional group supporting Medimmune portfolio from preclinical to post marketing, responsible for biomarker development for pharmacodynamics and patient stratification, pharmacokinetics bioanalysis for exposure-response evaluation, in vitro cytokine release testing for safety assessment, and immunogenicity assessment for regulatory submission. Her group also contributes to investigation of mechanism of action and lead selection of candidate drugs as well as development of companion diagnostics. Dr. Liang manages a GLP laboratory and also plays a DMPK project leader role for safety studies and clinical trials. She contributes to global regulatory interactions and submissions, including INDs, CTAs, IMPDs and BLAs.

Prior to joining Medimmune, Dr. Liang was a senior scientist at Abgenix, leading a centralized antibody-screening group for lead selection and characterization of therapeutic antibodies. Before Abgenix, Dr. Liang was a scientist at Berlex Biosciences, supporting small molecule drug discovery and development and played a key role in advancing a chemokine project from concept to clinical trials.

Dr. Liang holds B.S in Pharmacy from Peking University Medical School in China and Ph.D in Pharmacology from Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received postdoctoral training from University of Virginia. Dr. Liang is a co-inventor for a number of patents, has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and has been invited to present at many international conferences.

 
Abstract: Immunogenicity assessment is ...Read More 

Immunogenicity assessment is a requirement for biopharmaceutics registration. It is often evaluated in clinical studies as a secondary endpoint. Novel drug modalities may present unique bioanalytical and/or strategical considerations that should be incorporated into immunogenicity testing plan. In this presentation, we will use case examples to discuss approaches to overcome challenges to enable accurate immunogenicity reporting and clinical impact assessment.

 Read Less
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11:05
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Insights into Role of Type 1 Interferon
 
Kingston   Mills
Kingston HG Mills
Professor of Experimental Immunology
Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Kingston   Mills
Kingston HG Mills
Professor of Experimental Immunology
Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute
 
About Speaker:
 
Abstract: A recently identified subpopulation o...Read More 

A recently identified subpopulation of memory T cells, that reside in peripheral tissues and do not recirculate, have been termed tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells. TRM cells that express CD69 or CD69 and CD103 (αEβ7 integrin) provide a first line of defence against infection at mucosal surfaces, responding rapidly without a need for recruitment of T cells from the circulation. TRM cells that reside in the epithelial tissues of a mucosal site are specific for pathogens previously encountered at that mucosal tissue. It has also been suggested that TRM cells may non-specifically expand in tissues during infection with an unrelated pathogen and may therefore function like innate immune cells. We have examined the role of innate and adaptive immune responses in protection against the respiratory pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis is a re-emerging infectious disease despite the introduction of safer acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines that have replaced the reactogenic whole cell pertussis (wP) vaccines in most developed countries. However aP vaccines are less effective and fail to sustain protective immunity, probably because of their limited ability to induce immunological memory. Studies in animal models have shown that innate immune mechanisms, involving dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells and antimicrobial peptides help to control primary infection with B. pertussis, while complete bacterial clearance requires cellular immunity mediated by Th1 and Th17 cells. Protective adaptive immunity against B. pertussis generated by previous infection or immunization with a wP vaccine appears to be mediated largely by Th1 cells and opsonizing antibody, with a smaller role for Th17 cells. In contrast, the less efficacious alum-adjuvanted aP vaccine induce strong toxin-neutralizing antibodies, Th2 and Th17 cells but have limited ability to induce Th1 cells. Furthermore, wP are more effective than aP in generating lung TRM cells that maintain long term immunity against infection in the respiratory tract. We have demonstrated that formulation of aP vaccines with TLR and STING agonists as adjuvants enhances induction of Th1/Th17 and TRM cells in mice, especially when delivered by the nasal route and this improves their efficacy over alum-adjuvanted injectable vaccines. Vaccine that induce TRM cells as well as Th1/Th17 cells are likely to hold the key to long term protection against a range of respiratory pathogens in humans.

 Read Less
11:05
Expanding the Utility of a Functional Reporter Gene Assay to Clinical Monitoring of TNF Antagonist Biosimilars
 
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Immunology Medical Director
ARUP Laboratories
About Speaker: Dr. Lazar-Molnar is an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in biological sciences at the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary and completed a postdoctoral fellows... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Immunology Medical Director
ARUP Laboratories
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Lazar-Molnar is an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in biological sciences at the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Stanley G. Nathenson at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, where she was studying immune regulation through costimulatory molecules and finding new ways for designing immunotherapy. She was the recipient of a Cancer Research Institute postdoctoral fellowship and the Belfer Outstanding Postdoctoral Research Award in 2009. She completed a clinical immunology fellowship at the University of Utah and is currently a medical director in Immunology at ARUP and assistant director of the Histocompatibility & Immunogenetics Laboratory at the University of Utah. Her research interests include cellular immunology, immunotherapy, and transplantation immunology. Dr. Lazar-Molnar is board certified by the American Board of Medical Laboratory Immunology (ABMLI) and American Board of Histocompatibility and Immunologenetics (ABHI).

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11:30
Regulation of airway inflammation, homeostasis and novel mechanisms of innate immunity
 
Ignacio  Juncadella
Ignacio Juncadella
Principal Scientist, Immunology and Respiratory Research
Boehringer Ingelheim
About Speaker: Ignacio J. Juncadella currently works as a principal scientist and project leader in the department of Immunology and Respiratory Disease Research at Boehhringer Ingelheim, Inc. His research primarily focuses on the identification and validation of t... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Ignacio  Juncadella
Ignacio Juncadella
Principal Scientist, Immunology and Respiratory Research
Boehringer Ingelheim
 
About Speaker:

Ignacio J. Juncadella currently works as a principal scientist and project leader in the department of Immunology and Respiratory Disease Research at Boehhringer Ingelheim, Inc. His research primarily focuses on the identification and validation of therapeutic concepts related to inflammation, autoimmunity and fibrotic pathways in human disease. Ignacio obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2008. Ignacio joined Boehringer Ingelheim after his postdoctoral training with Dr. Kodi S. Ravichandran at the University of Virginia where he studied mechanisms of tissue tolerance and homeostasis, innate immunity and how defects in apoptotic cell clearance, a process call ‘efferocytosis’ results in exacerbated lung inflammation.

 
Abstract: Many chronic lung diseases such as as...Read More 

Many chronic lung diseases such as asthma and COPD are associated with defects in clearance of apoptotic cells, a process call ‘efferocytosis’. Exposure to pollutants, allergens or pathogens such as respiratory viruses can induce cell death in the airways and are associated with acute exacerbations. Failure to clear death cells results in the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), inflammatory mediators which contribute to the development of chronic inflammation, disease exacerbations and possibly disease progression. Using several methodologies, we recently demonstrated the ability of airway epithelial cells to regulate airway inflammation to allergens owning to their ability to engulf and clear apoptotic epithelial cells. Furthermore, the ability of lung epithelial cells to clear death cells is influenced by a novel mechanism involving macrophages redirection of phagocytosis through micro-vesicle dependent communication.

Another area of interest is the regulation of viral immunity. Expression of inflammatory genes is post-transcriptionally regulated and requires nuclear export proteins for translation. The role of nuclear export protein in innate immunity is poorly understood. Through an unbiased proteomic and RNAi screens, we identified the nuclear export protein NXF1 as a novel regulator of IRF5 signaling. Further understanding of this novel pathway may provide useful insights on future therapeutic aimed at blocking viral induced exacerbations.

 Read Less
11:30
 
Zuben Sauna
Zuben Sauna
Principal Investigator, Haematology, Research and Review
CBER, FDA
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Zuben Sauna
Zuben Sauna
Principal Investigator, Haematology, Research and Review
CBER, FDA
 
About Speaker:
1
1
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11:55
 
Alison  Humbles
Alison Humbles
Fellow, Principal Scientist
MedImmune
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Alison  Humbles
Alison Humbles
Fellow, Principal Scientist
MedImmune
 
About Speaker:
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11:55
Panel Discussion
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Immunology Medical Director
ARUP Laboratories
 
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Immunology Medical Director
ARUP Laboratories
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Lazar-Molnar is an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in biological sciences at the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Stanley G. Nathenson at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, where she was studying immune regulation through costimulatory molecules and finding new ways for designing immunotherapy. She was the recipient of a Cancer Research Institute postdoctoral fellowship and the Belfer Outstanding Postdoctoral Research Award in 2009. She completed a clinical immunology fellowship at the University of Utah and is currently a medical director in Immunology at ARUP and assistant director of the Histocompatibility & Immunogenetics Laboratory at the University of Utah. Her research interests include cellular immunology, immunotherapy, and transplantation immunology. Dr. Lazar-Molnar is board certified by the American Board of Medical Laboratory Immunology (ABMLI) and American Board of Histocompatibility and Immunologenetics (ABHI).

Meina  Liang
Meina Liang
Director, Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis
MedImmune
 
Meina  Liang
Meina Liang
Director, Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis
MedImmune
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Meina Liang has broad experiences in drug development of small molecule and biologics across therapeutic areas, including antibody-drug conjugate and immunotherapy. Dr. Liang is currently director of Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis at Medimmune, a subsidiary of AstraZeneca. She leads a centralized functional group supporting Medimmune portfolio from preclinical to post marketing, responsible for biomarker development for pharmacodynamics and patient stratification, pharmacokinetics bioanalysis for exposure-response evaluation, in vitro cytokine release testing for safety assessment, and immunogenicity assessment for regulatory submission. Her group also contributes to investigation of mechanism of action and lead selection of candidate drugs as well as development of companion diagnostics. Dr. Liang manages a GLP laboratory and also plays a DMPK project leader role for safety studies and clinical trials. She contributes to global regulatory interactions and submissions, including INDs, CTAs, IMPDs and BLAs.

Prior to joining Medimmune, Dr. Liang was a senior scientist at Abgenix, leading a centralized antibody-screening group for lead selection and characterization of therapeutic antibodies. Before Abgenix, Dr. Liang was a scientist at Berlex Biosciences, supporting small molecule drug discovery and development and played a key role in advancing a chemokine project from concept to clinical trials.

Dr. Liang holds B.S in Pharmacy from Peking University Medical School in China and Ph.D in Pharmacology from Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received postdoctoral training from University of Virginia. Dr. Liang is a co-inventor for a number of patents, has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and has been invited to present at many international conferences.

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12:20
Lunch
1
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Keynote Panel
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3:45
Conference Concludes