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ImmunoTX Summit

2018-04-232018-11-162018-10-30
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The 2019 agenda is currently being formed.

Please come back and visit this page for updates.

Below is the Agenda from 2018

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Day 1 - Tuesday, January 30, 2018
7:30
Continental Breakfast & Registration
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8:15
Opening Remarks
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10:20
Morning Networking Break
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Cytokines & Inflammation 2018
Metabolic Regulation of Immunity & Inflammation
Moderator: Pejman Soroosh, Principal Scientist and Head, Immunobiology Research Team (IRT), Janssen
11:05
Metabolism of Lupus T cells
 
Laurence  Morel
Laurence Morel
Mary and Ryan Whisenant Family Professor of Pathology
University of Florida
About Speaker: Laurence Morel obtained her PhD from the University of Aix-Marseille (France). She trained as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Ward Wakeland at the University of Florida (USA) in immunogenetics, where she started to work on the genetic basis of lupus i... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Laurence  Morel
Laurence Morel
Mary and Ryan Whisenant Family Professor of Pathology
University of Florida
 
About Speaker:

Laurence Morel obtained her PhD from the University of Aix-Marseille (France). She trained as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Ward Wakeland at the University of Florida (USA) in immunogenetics, where she started to work on the genetic basis of lupus in mouse models. She was appointed with a faculty position in the department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine at UF in 1999, where she is currently a tenured professor and the Vice Chair for Research and Academic Affairs. Her research focuses on the mechanisms of lupus pathogenesis using mouse models as well as patients’ samples. In addition to genetic studies, her studies now extend to immune metabolism, the role of the microbiome, and the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lupus pathogenesis. Her long-term goal is to identify genes and pathways responsible for lupus susceptibility, to characterize their contribution to autoimmune immunopathology, and to translate these findings into therapeutic targets.

 
Abstract: Autoreactive CD4 T cells are key effe...Read More 

Autoreactive CD4 T cells are key effectors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). It is hypothesized that 1) SLE T cells have metabolic defects that impair their functions; 2) Targeting CD4 T cell metabolism may abrogate CD4 T cell inflammatory functions and reduce disease symptoms in SLE mice and in CD4 T cells from SLE patients. CD4 T cells from lupus mice and patients have a significantly higher metabolism as well as an enhanced mTOR activity as compared to controls. In vitro, both metformin, which inhibits mitochondrial complex I and activates AMPK, and 2-DG, a glucose inhibitor, blocked IFNγ production and metformin increased IL-2 production. In vivo, a combined treatment with metformin and 2-DG, normalized T cell metabolism and reversed disease phenotypes in four lupus mouse models. Remarkably, the number of TFH cells, which correlates with disease severity in patients, was normalized by the combination treatment in every model. Further, excessive IFNγ production by CD4 T cells from SLE patients was also normalized by metformin. In addition, we have evidence in the mouse that treatment with metabolic inhibitors do not impair T cell dependent humoral responses or protection against a viral infection.

In conclusion, the combination of a glucose inhibitor with metformin restores T cell function and reverses disease across diverse mouse models of SLE, without global immunosuppression, and metformin treatment normalizes the function of T cells from SLE patients. We propose that T cell metabolism may serve as a biomarker of disease activity and provides a novel target for immune intervention in SLE.

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Immunotherapeutics & Immunomonitoring 2018
Novel Targets for Immunotherapy
Moderator: Kamala K Maddali, VP, Biopharm Market Development, Collaborations and Companion Diagnostics, Cancer Genetics, Inc.
11:05
Driving CD8+ T Cell Responses to Mutational Neoantigens in Tumors – Harnessing Immunogenic Viral Vectors
 
Karin Jooss
Karin Jooss
Executive Vice President of Research & Chief Scientific Officer
Gritstone Oncology
About Speaker: Karin Jooss serves as Chief Scientific Officer of Gritstone Oncology. Dr. Jooss joined Gritstone from Pfizer, where she served as head of Cancer Immunotherapeutics within the Vaccine Immunotherapeutics department for seven years. While at Pfizer, s... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Karin Jooss
Karin Jooss
Executive Vice President of Research & Chief Scientific Officer
Gritstone Oncology
 
About Speaker: Karin Jooss serves as Chief Scientific Officer of Gritstone Oncology. Dr. Jooss joined Gritstone from Pfizer, where she served as head of Cancer Immunotherapeutics within the Vaccine Immunotherapeutics department for seven years. While at Pfizer, she built and led immuno-oncology teams, was a member of the Vaccine Immunotherapeutics leadership team and served as the head of the Immunopharmacology team. Her duties included overseeing the assessment of all cancer vaccine in-licensing opportunities, and developing and launching Pfizer’s first clinical cancer vaccine program deploying a variety of vaccine platforms and immune modulators to build a multi-component vaccine-based immunotherapy regimen. Prior to joining Pfizer, Jooss served as vice president of Research at Cell Genesys, Inc. where she oversaw all research activities related to the company’s cancer vaccine and oncolytic virotherapy programs. Dr.Jooss received her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Marburg in Germany and performed postgraduate work in gene therapy and immunology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is on the editorial board of Molecular Therapy and Journal of Gene Medicine and is a member of the immunology and educational committee for the American Society of Gene Therapy as well as the Industry Task Force of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC).
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11:30
Sterol Metabolism and Nuclear Receptor RORgamma in T Cells-Mediated Antitumor Immunity
 
Xiao Hu
Xiao Hu
Executive Director
Lycera Corp
About Speaker: Dr. Xiao Hu is currently Executive Director of Biology, head of the immune oncology group at Lycera Corp. He joined Lycera in 2010 bringing extensive experience in drug discovery, particularly around nuclear receptors, metabolic enzymes and gene regu... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Xiao Hu
Xiao Hu
Executive Director
Lycera Corp
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Xiao Hu is currently Executive Director of Biology, head of the immune oncology group at Lycera Corp. He joined Lycera in 2010 bringing extensive experience in drug discovery, particularly around nuclear receptors, metabolic enzymes and gene regulation. Prior to Lycera Dr. Hu was a group and project leader at Pfizer/Pharmacia, where in 10 years he initiated and led multiple projects from idea to clinical testing, resulting in 4 successful IND filings and Phase I trials in inflammation/autoimmune/metabolic diseases. Since joining Lycera, Dr. Hu has held key leadership roles in projects targeting RORgamma for immunotherapy of cancer and for autoimmune diseases. He contributed significantly to the successful completion of Phase I and initiation of II trials of a RORgamma agonist compound in cancer patients. He has also been responsible for initiating and executing multiple new projects targeting novel immune oncology mechanisms.

Dr. Hu is an active member of SITC (Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer) and Endocrine Society. He received his B.S. from University of Science and Technology of China, Ph.D. from Indiana University and completed his postdoctoral training on transcriptional regulation of metabolism at University of Pennsylvania with Dr. Mitchell Lazar.

 
Abstract: When naïve T cells are activated...Read More 

When naïve T cells are activated by antigens, a series of signaling events is initiated from the T-cell receptor leading to metabolic reprogramming that prepares the cells for proliferation. Under the influence of different cytokines, these activated T cells can differentiate into different lineages of effectors such as Type 1, Type 2, Type 17 and immunosuppressive regulator T cells with each lineage controlled by distinct transcription factors. Nuclear Receptor RORgamma is a master transcription factor that controls the differentiation of naïve T cells into the Type 17 (Th17 and Tc17) lineage. We show that Type 17 T cells increase cholesterol uptake and biosynthesis while decrease metabolism and efflux and accumulate cholesterol synthetic precursor desmosterol and its sulfate conjugates during differentiation. These sterols serve as endogenous RORgamma agonists and blocking their synthesis selectively affects T cells committed to the Type 17 lineage. Our findings demonstrate that coordinated sterol metabolism controls Type 17 differentiation at the level of selectively controlling the activity of RORgamma. T cells play critical roles in antitumor immunity. However in tumor microenvironment, T cells become exhausted and shut down multiple metabolic pathways including sterol synthetic machinery. We hypothesized that activating RORgamma with synthetic agonists would relieve exhaustion of Type 17 T cells and enhance antitumor immunity. Indeed, synthetic RORgamma agonist-treated T cells showed increased production of IL-17A and other cytokines/chemokines, decreased exhaustion markers such as PD-1 and LAG3, and improved cell survival, which translated to a potent and durable antitumor response as adoptive cell therapy against established tumors. Moreover, oral administration of RORgamma agonists significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in an immune-dependent manner in multiple murine syngeneic tumor models. Thus RORgamma agonists are a promising immunotherapy approach for the treatment of cancers and further testing of RORgamma agonists in clinical trials is warranted. A synthetic RORgamma agonist LYC-55716 was well tolerated in a Phase 1 dose-escalation trial in cancer patients and is currently being tested in Phase 2 expansion studies in patients with solid tumors.

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11:30
IGN002: A Focused ImmunoTherapeutic (FIT) for NHL
 
Michael  Gresser
Michael Gresser
Chief Scientific Officer
Immungene
About Speaker: Mike Gresser, Ph.D. is Chief Scientific Officer for ImmuneGene. From 2000-2006, Dr. Gresser served as Vice President, Research for Inflammation at Amgen, Inc. Prior to Amgen, he was at the Merck Frosst Center for Therapeutic Research where he rose to... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Michael  Gresser
Michael Gresser
Chief Scientific Officer
Immungene
 
About Speaker:

Mike Gresser, Ph.D. is Chief Scientific Officer for ImmuneGene. From 2000-2006, Dr. Gresser served as Vice President, Research for Inflammation at Amgen, Inc. Prior to Amgen, he was at the Merck Frosst Center for Therapeutic Research where he rose to be Executive Director of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He received his Ph.D in Biochemistry from Brandeis University and did postdoctoral studies at UCLA. Before joining Merck Frosst in 1988 he was Pr ofessor of Chemistry at Simon Frazer University in Burnaby, British Columbia.

 
Abstract: Interferon alpha (IFNα) has bee...Read More 

Interferon alpha (IFNα) has been reported to provide a survival benefit when administered systemically to patients with various types of cancer. Its use has been limited by its safety profile. The Company’s IGN002 molecule was designed to improve both safety and efficacy of IFNα in lymphoma by targeting it to CD20-expressing cancer cells. IGN002 is a fusion protein consisting of an anti-CD20 antibody linked to IFNα-2b. This results in minimizing the exposure of IFNα-2b to non-cancer cells, which accounts for the well-known dose-limiting toxic effects of conventional IFNα. IGN002 is much more potent than IFNα-2b on cells that express CD20, and much less potent than IFNα-2b on cells that do not express CD20. This pattern of relative activities has been found in assays measuring inhibition of proliferation, viral protection, and STAT1 phosphorylation. We believe that this will translate to a broad therapeutic window in cancer patients. IGN002 is thus far well-tolerated by patients, who have experienced no adverse effects more severe than transient grades 1 and 2 infusion-related reactions (IRR), at much higher IFN exposures than those that result in dose-limiting toxicities in the case of IFNα-2b. IGN002 is one example from ImmunGene’s portfolio of focused interferon therapeutics (FIT), which are antibody-IFNα fusion proteins suitable for treatment of various types of cancer. Each of our FIT agents uses an antibody against a tumor associated antigen (TAA) to focus and amplify the effect of IFNα2b on cancer cells and attenuate its effect on healthy cells.

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11:55
Developing Microbiome Interventions for Metabolic and Inflammatory Conditions
 
John  Eid
John Eid
Chief Scientific Officer and Co-Founder
Whole Biome
About Speaker: John Eid is the CSO and Co-Founder of Whole Biome Inc. He has led fundamental technology development for over a decade in diverse areas that include advanced microscopy, single molecule detection and analyses, automated data acquisition systems, biop... Read Full Bio 
 
 
John  Eid
John Eid
Chief Scientific Officer and Co-Founder
Whole Biome
 
About Speaker:

John Eid is the CSO and Co-Founder of Whole Biome Inc. He has led fundamental technology development for over a decade in diverse areas that include advanced microscopy, single molecule detection and analyses, automated data acquisition systems, biophysical system modeling, and genome sequencing applications. Prior to co-founding Whole Biome, he was a Principal Scientist at Pacific Biosciences. He completed his postdoctoral research at the Roland Institute at Harvard University, his Ph.D. in Biophysics and Computational Biology at the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, and his B.S. in Applied and Engineering Physics from Cornell University.

11:55
Multivalent Adoptive Cell Therapy Using Novel XPRESIDENT® Derived Targets
 
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
About Speaker: Dr Walter joined Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH in 2005 where he became VP Immunology. For over 15 years he has been active in the field of cancer immunotherapy and a leader in human T-cell biology. In addition to supporting the development of the XPR... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
 
About Speaker:

Dr Walter joined Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH in 2005 where he became VP Immunology. For over 15 years he has been active in the field of cancer immunotherapy and a leader in human T-cell biology. In addition to supporting the development of the XPRESIDENT® technology platform, under his leadership, Immatics developed its powerful Immunomonitoring and T-cell receptor (TCR) discovery platforms to support the generation of safe and effective T-cell-based therapeutic modalities. In 2015, Dr Walter co-founded Immatics US, Inc. in Houston, Texas as a joint venture between Immatics and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) to develop next-generation adoptive cell therapies (ACT). He contributed significantly to raising the necessary funding including a $20m CPRIT grant by the State of Texas. As CSO, at Immatics US he leads a team that is responsible for Product Science, Process Development, Manufacturing, Quality Control and Program Management for Immatics’ cell therapy programs. Dr Walter is an inventor on numerous patents and patent applications and has co-authored more than 30 publications in prestigious peer-reviewed journals including Nature Medicine, Cell Reports, Brain and Blood. Dr Walter gained his PhD in Immunology from the University of Tuebingen, Germany.

 
Abstract: Tumor evasion due to tumor heterogene...Read More 

Tumor evasion due to tumor heterogeneity or antigen loss is a major limitation for the successful treatment of solid tumors using adoptive T cell therapy. Multivalent approaches using multiple relevant targets in parallel should be a solution to this problem, however they have been conducted in only very limited way due to lack of safe and validated targets. The XPRESIDENT® platform allows access to a novel target space using a combination of ultra-sensitive quantitative mass spectrometry, transcriptomics, immunology and bioinformatics based on the immunopeptidome of human normal and tumor tissues. We present data from one clinical-stage platform (ACTolog®) using up to four validated targets per patient and provide an update to a complementary, genetically engineered approach, ACTengine®.

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12:20
High Fidelity Diagnostic Grade Immunoassays (Within a Fully Automated Microfluidic Circuit)
 
Howard Spiegel
Howard Spiegel
Simple Plex Specialist
Protein Simple, A Division of Bio-Techne
About Speaker: Howard Spiegel is a reformed bench scientist. He earned his technical skills working under Tony Fauci (when he was a merely a Section Head) making and purifying synthetic peptides. After scoring too low on MCAT and GRE he sold his soul and became a s... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Howard Spiegel
Howard Spiegel
Simple Plex Specialist
Protein Simple, A Division of Bio-Techne
 
About Speaker:

Howard Spiegel is a reformed bench scientist. He earned his technical skills working under Tony Fauci (when he was a merely a Section Head) making and purifying synthetic peptides. After scoring too low on MCAT and GRE he sold his soul and became a salesman. For the last 30 years Howard has found a way to maintain integrity while serving the research community. Howard joined MesoScale(MSD) in the early days of 2004 and then ProteinSimple (that became Bio-Techne) in 2014. He now takes his work wife (ELLA) on the road and wows scientist with hands-free 90-minute ELISA’s.

 
Abstract: Quantitative measurement of proteins ...Read More 

Quantitative measurement of proteins is essential for evaluation of biomarkers and biological processes, yet this common technique is impractical to evaluate multiple proteins, owing to cross-reactivity, poor reproducibility and lack of sensitivity. Simple Plex technology offers a new alternative to multiplexing through its spatial separation of target analytes into distinct microfluidic channels, and the ability to automate the analysis within a low volume cartridge. Simple Plex demonstrates significant benefit over common multiplexing technologies in terms of low sample volume requirements, greater sensitivity and dynamic range, and time savings. Never before has moving from single to multiple assays actually IMPROVED performance. Five benefits: fully automated , 1 hour time-to-result , self-contained modularity, CV’s run ~3%

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12:20
Combined Inhibition of IDO1 and PD-1 as an Effective Therapeutic Strategy in Cancer
 
Holly Koblish
Holly Koblish
Director, Pharmacology
Incyte Research Institute
About Speaker: Holly received her Ph.D. in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Pennsylvania and completed her postdoctoral training at Princeton University. Prior to joining Incyte in 2006, Holly held scientific research positions with 3-Dimensional P... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Holly Koblish
Holly Koblish
Director, Pharmacology
Incyte Research Institute
 
About Speaker:

Holly received her Ph.D. in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Pennsylvania and completed her postdoctoral training at Princeton University. Prior to joining Incyte in 2006, Holly held scientific research positions with 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals and Johnson and Johnson. At Incyte, Holly has been involved in target validation and drug discovery efforts within oncology. She has been involved with a number of Incyte’s kinase programs, including PIM, FGFR and c-Met, and immuno-oncology programs including IDO1, arginase, GITR and OX40.

 
Abstract: Antibodies to checkpoint receptors ha...Read More 

Antibodies to checkpoint receptors have demonstrated unprecedented efficacy in a broad range of tumors types and represent a new paradigm in cancer treatment focused on inhibition of mechanisms that suppress anti-tumoral immunity.  Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) has also emerged as an immunotherapy target due to its role in regulating T-cell responses.  Preclinical and early clinical data will be described that support the combination of IDO1 inhibition with antibodies to checkpoint receptors.

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12:45
Lunch Session: Immunomonitoring & Novel High Throughput Technologies
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Immunogenicity & Immunotoxicity 2018
Lunch Session: Immunomonitoring & Novel High Throughput Technologies
Moderator: Kamala K Maddali, VP, Biopharm Market Development, Collaborations and Companion Diagnostics, Cancer Genetics, Inc.
1:00
Next Generation Immune Monitoring in Clinical Trials- Immune Cell Measurements using Epiontis ID
 
Ulrich Hoffmueller
Ulrich Hoffmueller
Vice President, Immune Monitoring Solutions
Epiontis, Precision for Medicine
About Speaker: Since the foundation of Epiontis in 2003, in which Uli participated as a founder, he is Chief Business Officer of the company. Prior to founding Epiontis, he worked at Jerini AG, Berlin, Germany (now part of Shire Pharmaceuticals) from 1999 to 2003 a... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Ulrich Hoffmueller
Ulrich Hoffmueller
Vice President, Immune Monitoring Solutions
Epiontis, Precision for Medicine
 
About Speaker:

Since the foundation of Epiontis in 2003, in which Uli participated as a founder, he is Chief Business Officer of the company. Prior to founding Epiontis, he worked at Jerini AG, Berlin, Germany (now part of Shire Pharmaceuticals) from 1999 to 2003 as Director of Business Development. Uli completed business school in Berlin, Germany and Cambridge, UK from 2002 to 2004 in parallel to his positions in the biotech industry. He earned his Ph.D. at the Charité University Clinic, Berlin, Germany, in 1998, and was honored with the Charité Research Award in 1997. Uli received his Diplom (Masters) in Biochemistry in 1995 from Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

 
Abstract: The responsiveness of the immune syst...Read More 

The responsiveness of the immune system is a prominent medical parameter with high relevance in oncology, autoimmunity and infectious diseases. This responsiveness often described by cell counts and ratios of different leukocyte subpopulations. Current standard methods – flow cytometry in peripheral blood, immunohistochemistry (IHC) in solid tissue – have a limited ability for exact cell quantification owing to subjective gating protocols for FACS and lacking precision for IHC. In addition, stability of blood samples is a logistical and economic challenge especially in samples from multi-center clinical trials.

The discovery of cell type specific epigenetic markers allows precise and robust quantitation of immune cells in all human samples. The technology, called Epiontis ID, is based on quantitative PCR targeting genomic DNA. Therefore, readout is stable and samples can be frozen and easily shipped. This allows monitoring of patients in multicenter studies, retrospective studies, comparison of results between different studies, and routine monitoring.

Epiontis ID assays for Treg, Th17, Tfh, overall T-cells, Granulocytes, Monocytes, NK, overall/naïve CD8, CD4 and B cells will be presented in cancer and immune disease patients. The results reveal the same trends as measurements with alternative methods, while showing higher precision. Furthermore, the tests can be applied on both blood and tissue allowing measurements of circulating and tissue-infiltrating immune cells. An addition technical benefit is the small sample amount requirement of epigenetic assays. Tissue amounts down to 1mg and blood volumes of 75µl are sufficient and permit processing of biopsy material and small blood samples from pediatric studies.

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1:25
Predictive Single T-cell Functional Response Biomarkers in CAR-T and PD1/CTLA4 Checkpoint based Cancer Immunotherapies
 
Sean Mackay
Sean Mackay
CEO
IsoPlexis
About Speaker: Sean is the CEO of Isoplexis. IsoPlexis is developing novel technologies at the forefront of the revolution in immunity-based treatments of cancer. IsoPlexis has created a next-generation system, capable of identifying and predicting patient response... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Sean Mackay
Sean Mackay
CEO
IsoPlexis
 
About Speaker:

Sean is the CEO of Isoplexis. IsoPlexis is developing novel technologies at the forefront of the revolution in immunity-based treatments of cancer. IsoPlexis has created a next-generation system, capable of identifying and predicting patient responses to immunotherapy more accurately than conventional assays. Their single-cell multiplexed proteomics platform helps identify the patients most likely to respond to a variety of novel immunotherapies.

 
Abstract: Using the IsoCode Chip, researchers h...Read More 

Using the IsoCode Chip, researchers have captured data to determine the polyfunctional strength index (PSI), or functional strength, of individual T-cells, across thousands of cells at a time. By defining the T-cell functional strength, the PSI metric has predicted complete or partial patient response to CAR-T therapy, pre-infusion, and checkpoint-based therapies, with statistical significance. Data obtained with the IsoCode Chip was used in measuring the function of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for predicting patient response receiving anti PD-1 blocking therapy (P-value 0.02). Single-cell TILs analysis revealed significant increase of polyfunctional cytokines in patients who responded to anti-PD-1 therapy, compared to those resistant to therapy or in the control group. With the single-cell PSI, researchers are able to reveal functional subsets of CAR-T cells and the distinct secreted protein profiles of those individual CAR-T cells. Isoplexis demonstrates data that shows that patients with highly functional T-cell subsets in vitro tend to have strong responses to CAR-T therapies in vivo (P-Value 0.01), and the patients with inactive T-cell subsets have weaker responses. These single T-cell subsets, and thus sensitive patient differences, are missed when assaying patient sample with existing bulk immune profiling technologies.

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1:50
Advancing the Development of Personalized and Targeted Immune Therapies Utilizing CGI's AntigenID™
 
Steve Siferd
Steve Siferd
Senior Director, Biopharma Business Development
Cancer Genetics, Inc.
About Speaker: Steve Siferd is a sales and marketing executive with 20 years of experience in genetics and molecular biology delivering molecular diagnostics services in support of clinical development projects for biopharma and in vitro diagnostic companies.  Thr... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Steve Siferd
Steve Siferd
Senior Director, Biopharma Business Development
Cancer Genetics, Inc.
 
About Speaker:

Steve Siferd is a sales and marketing executive with 20 years of experience in genetics and molecular biology delivering molecular diagnostics services in support of clinical development projects for biopharma and in vitro diagnostic companies.  Throughout his career, Steve has sought to improve human health by leveraging genomics in the clinical development process to achieve better therapies and outcomes. Steve has extensive experience in the application of next generation sequencing technologies in the clinical and diagnostic development process, and is a recognized expert in precision medicine. 

 
Abstract: Cancer is a genetic disease where tum...Read More 

Cancer is a genetic disease where tumors can accumulate somatic mutations which can alter downstream protein expression.  These altered proteins, when presented on the surface of a tumor cell can be recognized by T cells eliciting an anti-tumor immune response.  Historically, identifying tumor-specific mutant antigens was a difficult and protracted process.  By leveraging NGS with advanced computational analysis, CGI has created an integrated neoantigen pipeline to both identify novel expressed mutations and algorithmically estimate the binding affinity of the translated protein to the major histocompatibility complex haplotypes encoded by each genome.  Our AntigenID™ workflow can be utilized to both characterize overall somatic mutation burden and neoantigen burden, and validate predicted epitopes as a precursor to designing novel therapeutic agents.

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Cytokines & Inflammation 2018
Influence of Microbiome on Immune Responses
Moderator: Laurence Morel; Mary and Ryan Whisenant Family Professor of Pathology, University of Florida
2:30
Commensal Bacteria Regulate Allergic Sensitization to Food
 
Cathryn  Nagler
Cathryn Nagler
Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
The University of Chicago
About Speaker: Cathryn Nagler graduated with honors from Barnard College, Columbia University. She obtained her Ph.D. from the Sackler Institute of Biomedical Science at N.Y.U. School of Medicine and did a postdoctoral fellowship at M.I.T. She was Associate Profess... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Cathryn  Nagler
Cathryn Nagler
Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
The University of Chicago
 
About Speaker:

Cathryn Nagler graduated with honors from Barnard College, Columbia University. She obtained her Ph.D. from the Sackler Institute of Biomedical Science at N.Y.U. School of Medicine and did a postdoctoral fellowship at M.I.T. She was Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology) at Harvard Medical School prior to joining the University of Chicago in 2009. She received the inaugural Bunning Food Allergy Professorship in 2011. Dr. Nagler has participated in numerous review panels for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, NIDDK, NIAID, and Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE). She recently began her second term on FARE’s research advisory board. She has served the American Association of Immunologists (AAI) as Section Editor for the Journal of Immunology, Instructor (Mucosal Immunology) for the Introduction to Immunology course and as member of the Program, Clinical Immunology, Publications and Awards Committees. She is the senior editor for Clinical and Translational Immunology for the AAI’s new journal ImmunoHorizons. She has also served as an elected Councilor of the Society for Mucosal Immunology and is an Associate Editor of the journal Mucosal Immunology. Dr. Nagler has a long-standing interest in the mechanisms governing tolerance to dietary antigens and the potential immunomodulatory features of the oral route of antigen administration. Her most recent work examines how commensal bacteria regulate susceptibility to allergic responses to food. She has applied insights gained from studying pre-clinical gnotobiotic murine models of cow’s milk allergy to launch a new company, ClostraBio, which is developing microbiome-modulating therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of food allergy.

 
Abstract: The prevalence of food allergy has ex...Read More 

The prevalence of food allergy has experienced an unprecedented increase in Western societies, rising by as much as 20% in a recent ten-year period. We have previously described a role for mucosa-associated commensal bacteria in protection from allergic sensitization in mice. To understand how the microbiota regulates allergic disease in humans, we have now colonized germ free mice with human bacteria from the feces of healthy or cow’s milk allergic (CMA) infants. Our data show that colonization with a healthy human microbiota is sufficient to protect mice against sensitization to the cow’s milk allergen -lactoglobulin, whereas colonization with a human CMA microbiota fails to protect. By analyzing operational taxonomic units (OTUs) differentially abundant between our human fecal donors we have defined a microbiota signature that distinguishes the CMA and heathy populations in both the human donors and the colonized mice, emphasizing the clinical relevance of our gnotobiotic model. RNAseq analysis of gene expression in ileal intestinal epithelial cells across these donors revealed differentially expressed genes that separate healthy- and CMA-colonized mice and also highly correlate with the abundance of ileal OTUs related to the allergic phenotype in the CMA-colonized mice. These robust, pre-clinical gnotobiotic models are an ideal system to identify key host-microbial interactions that contribute to allergic sensitization to food and have informed the development of novel microbiome modulating therapeutics to prevent or treat food allergy.

Key benefits of this presentation include:

Examination of the critical role of the intestinal microbiota in regulating allergic sensitization to food.

The use of gnotobiotic mouse models to examine host-microbe interactions relevant to clinical disease.

Strategies involved in the formation of a company, ClostraBio, to advance novel synthetic drug formulations based on microbial metabolites.

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Immunotherapeutics & Immunomonitoring 2018
Combination Immunotherapy
Moderator: Holly Koblish, Director, Pharmacology, Incyte Research Institute
2:30
Antitumor Effects of Combination Immunotherapy
 
Joost Oppenheim
Joost Oppenheim
Senior Investigator
NIH NCI
About Speaker: Dr. Oppenheim pioneered the development of cytokine, chemokine and alarmin fields of research. He is currently studying the role of alarmins that activate toll-like receptors, in inducing immunity to cancer. He has been engaged in translational studi... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Joost Oppenheim
Joost Oppenheim
Senior Investigator
NIH NCI
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Oppenheim pioneered the development of cytokine, chemokine and alarmin fields of research. He is currently studying the role of alarmins that activate toll-like receptors, in inducing immunity to cancer. He has been engaged in translational studies aimed at utilizing alarmins as adjuvants in vaccines for use against infectious agents and tumors. He is also investigating means of blocking the immunosuppressive limb of immunity as exerted by T regulatory cells to augment antitumor immunity. Dr. Oppenheim is the Chief of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation and the Deputy Director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program at the National Cancer Institute which focuses on the effects of inflammation and the immune response on cancer.

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2:55
What is a "healthy" Microbiome?
 
Manoj  Dadlani
Manoj Dadlani
Chief Executive Officer
CosmosID
About Speaker: Mr. Manoj Dadlani serves as Chief Executive Officer at CosmosID, Inc., a genomic big data company focused on rapid identification of microorganisms for infectious disease diagnostics, public health surveillance, food safety monitoring, pharmaceutical... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Manoj  Dadlani
Manoj Dadlani
Chief Executive Officer
CosmosID
 
About Speaker:

Mr. Manoj Dadlani serves as Chief Executive Officer at CosmosID, Inc., a genomic big data company focused on rapid identification of microorganisms for infectious disease diagnostics, public health surveillance, food safety monitoring, pharmaceutical discovery, and microbiome analysis for health and wellness. Previously, Mr. Dadlani served as a partner at Applied Value Group, a management consulting and investment firm, and was co-founder and Chief Executive Officer at Rasa Industries, Ltd., a leading beverage manufacturing company in northern Nigeria. Mr. Dadlani has substantial experience in strategy, M&A, supply chain management, product development, marketing and business development. At Applied Value, he lead the US business in management consulting, advising fortune 500 companies in both revenue growth, cost reduction and lean management. As his role as CEO of CosmosID, Mr. Dadlani has lead the company to commercialize current products and develop new products in the microbial identification and characterization space. Mr. Dadlani received his Bachelors and Masters degrees in Biological Engineering from Cornell University.

 
Abstract: Recent research has shown that the mi...Read More 

Recent research has shown that the microbiome of the human gut has an increased role in an individual’s health. Gut microbiota composition can be correlated with health, various immune disorders, and diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and colon polyps. The gut microbiome is known to vary among individuals and across different geo-locations, therefore, measuring the extent of such variations is critical in determining the baseline core microbiome of what is “healthy”, which will help guide the understanding of dysbiosis and disease causation.

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2:55
Combinatorial Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy Using Anti-CD40 Antibody
 
Alexander  Rakhmilevich
Alexander Rakhmilevich
Distinguished Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison
About Speaker: Dr. Rakhmilevich is a distinguished scientist at the University of W isconsin-Madison. He obtained his MD and PhD degrees in Soviet Union. He has been working in the field of cancer immunology since 1985. His current laboratory research involves the ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Alexander  Rakhmilevich
Alexander Rakhmilevich
Distinguished Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Rakhmilevich is a distinguished scientist at the University of W isconsin-Madison. He obtained his MD and PhD degrees in Soviet Union. He has been working in the field of cancer immunology since 1985. His current laboratory research involves the develop ment of cancer immunotherapies using activation of macrophages via CD40 ligation

 
Abstract: CD40 ligation has been shown to induc...Read More 

CD40 ligation has been shown to induce antitumor effects in mice and cancer patients. We have demonstrated in several syngeneic mouse tumor models that anti-CD40 antibody, alone and in synergy with a toll-like receptor 9 agonist, CpG, and toll-receptor 4 agonist, MPL, activates macrophages and induces T cell-independent antitumor effects. T cell-independent antitumor efficacy of anti-CD40 and CpG can be further enhanced by chemotherapy. Anti-CD40 and CpG were synergistic with a T cell activation approach, involving in situ vaccine (intratumoral injections of IL-2 or IL-15 with anti-GD2 antibody) and checkpoint blockade, resulting in regression of a local advanced mouse B78 melanoma and immunological memory.

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3:20
Microbiome and Personalized Medicine
 
Ling-Yang Hao
Ling-Yang Hao
Principal Scientist, Immunology Biomarkers
Janssen R&D
About Speaker: Ling-Yang is currently a Principal Scientist at Janssen R&D within Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical sector. His role focuses on providing biomarkers support for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) assets within Immunology Therapeutic Area. Ling-... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Ling-Yang Hao
Ling-Yang Hao
Principal Scientist, Immunology Biomarkers
Janssen R&D
 
About Speaker:

Ling-Yang is currently a Principal Scientist at Janssen R&D within Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical sector. His role focuses on providing biomarkers support for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) assets within Immunology Therapeutic Area. Ling-Yang has been working on biomarkers with Janssen R&D since 2015. Prior to joining Janssen R&D, Ling-Yang worked on target discovery around T lymphocyte metabolic space at Lycera Corp. Earlier in his career, Ling-Yang received his Ph.D. at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine studying telomere biology and DNA damage responses and trained as a post doctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania and Howard Hughes Medical Institute on mechanisms of neurodegeneration.

3:20
T-SIGn Oncolytic Viruses: Systemic Delivery for Localized Production of Immunotherapeutic Combinations within Tumors
 
Brian  Champion
Brian Champion
Chief Scientific Officer
PsiOxus Therapeutics
About Speaker: Dr Brian Champion is Chief Scientific Officer and member of the Executive Management Team at PsiOxus Therapeutics Ltd, Oxford, UK where he is leading the scientific team in the development of novel oncolytic virus-based, tumor-specific immunogene the... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Brian  Champion
Brian Champion
Chief Scientific Officer
PsiOxus Therapeutics
 
About Speaker:

Dr Brian Champion is Chief Scientific Officer and member of the Executive Management Team at PsiOxus Therapeutics Ltd, Oxford, UK where he is leading the scientific team in the development of novel oncolytic virus-based, tumor-specific immunogene therapies for the treatment of cancer.   He was previously Executive Director and Head of Immunology for Pfizer's Vaccine Immunotherapeutics Research Unit in La Jolla, California, leading the immunology team providing expertise and immunoassays for Pfizer vaccine projects, program leader for an anti-IgE therapeutic vaccine for allergy/asthma, and a member of the leadership team. Prior to this he was Site Head for Pfizer Vaccine Research in the UK. Before joining Pfizer, Dr Champion was Chief Scientific Officer for Lorantis and Celldex in Cambridge (UK) developing protein and DNA-based, antigen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches to a variety of immunological diseases, including therapeutic vaccines and immunotherapeutic biomolecule approaches for cancer, infectious diseases, allergies and autoimmune disorders. Prior to Lorantis, he was with Glaxo and GlaxoWellcome (UK and USA) for 13 years, focusing primarily on target discovery and validation research for autoimmune, allergic and bone disorders.

 
Abstract: We have developed a broadly applicabl...Read More 

We have developed a broadly applicable platform system, based on the potent chimeric oncolytic adenovirus enadenotucirev (EnAd), for directing the selective localized production of a combination of immunotherapeutic agents within tumors following systemic dosing, while minimizing the potential for systemic off-target effects of such combination approaches. These “tumor-specific immunogene therapy (T-SIGn)”  virus candidates can be designed with a primary transgene (e.g. targeting a specific mechanism) together with 2-3 modulatory transgenes (e.g. encoding immunomodulators) to enhance or fine tune activity within the tumor microenvironment. The presentation will highlight recent data supporting both the platform and specific T-SIGn virus candidates.

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3:45
 
 
TBA (To Be Announced)
TBA (To Be Announced)

 
About Speaker:
3:45
Next Generation Combination Strategies to Enhance CAR Products for Multiple Myeloma
 
Blythe  Sather
Blythe Sather
Associate Director
Juno Therapeutics
About Speaker: Dr. Blythe Sather received her PhD from the University of Washington, Department of Immunology in 2007. For her thesis, she focused on understanding the role of homing receptors on the function of regulatory T cells in the laboratory of Dr. Danial Ca... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Blythe  Sather
Blythe Sather
Associate Director
Juno Therapeutics
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Blythe Sather received her PhD from the University of Washington, Department of Immunology in 2007. For her thesis, she focused on understanding the role of homing receptors on the function of regulatory T cells in the laboratory of Dr. Danial Campbell at the Benaroya Research Institute in Seattle. During her postdoctoral work at Seattle Children’s Research Institute in the laboratory of Dr. David Rawlings, she focused on developing lentiviral gene therapies and lead a team who did ground breaking work using megaTAL nucleases to insert chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) via gene editing-mediated homologous recombination into the CCR5 locus of primary T cells for HIV therapy. In 2014, her desire to bring these types of therapies to the clinic on a larger scale lead her to move to Juno Therapeutics to help develop their research division. Since at Juno, she been instrumental in building their CAR T cell development platform, leading the multiple myeloma CAR T cell program, as well leading the collaboration with Editas medicine to bring CRISPER-mediated gene editing to CAR and TCR T cell products.

 
Abstract: The development of a chimeric antigen...Read More 

The development of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that target antigens expressed on the surface of malignant plasma cells is a promising new treatment approach for relapsed refractory multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Although early clinical trials from several groups investigating single agent anti-B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) CAR-T cells achieved clinical responses in MM, other strategies may need to be taken to increase the effectiveness of this treatment. For my talk, I will discuss the current approaches that we are evaluating at Juno to solve three possible problems that could reduce the long term progression free survival of patients treated with a BCMA specific CAR T cell product: loss or downregulation of the BCMA antigen, poor persistence of the CAR T cell product and immunosuppression of the activity of the CAR T cell product mediated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. These approaches involve creative gene engineering of our CAR T cell products as well as drug combinations to enhance the overall activity. This discussion will highlight the challenges associated with treating MM patients with a CAR product and several ways that we as an industry can tackle these challenges. Juno is currently in the process of testing our new CAR T cell product with specificity for BCMA in MM patients and during our clinical trial we will be gathering key translational insights to help guide these next generation approaches. My talk will have the dual benefit of giving an overview of the challenges of treating myeloma with CAR T cells but also inform upon rational designs of next generation products to improve the efficacy of these products.

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4:10
Afternoon Networking Break
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Round Table Sessions
1
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4:55
Round Table 1: The Future of Tolerogenic Therapies for Adverse Immune Responses
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
 
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
 
About Speaker:

David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, University of Chicago (MS) and Yale (PhD). Following a fellowship at Oxford University, he held tenured positions at Duke University, University of Rochester, and University of Maryland Medical School. Dr. Scott has contributed to over 200 research papers on immunologic tolerance, and its application in autoimmune diseases, hemophilia and gene therapy. The author of two textbooks, including The Nature of Immunologic Tolerance, he ia recipient of a number of awards, e.g. Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Immunologists, a Boarhaave Professorship at Leiden University in Holland, and the 2009 Scientific Achievement Award from AAPS.

Round Table 2: Hallmarks of Attractive Cancer Immunotherapy Targets
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
 
Steffen  Walter
Steffen Walter
Chief Scientific Officer
Immatics
 
About Speaker:

Dr Walter joined Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH in 2005 where he became VP Immunology. For over 15 years he has been active in the field of cancer immunotherapy and a leader in human T-cell biology. In addition to supporting the development of the XPRESIDENT® technology platform, under his leadership, Immatics developed its powerful Immunomonitoring and T-cell receptor (TCR) discovery platforms to support the generation of safe and effective T-cell-based therapeutic modalities. In 2015, Dr Walter co-founded Immatics US, Inc. in Houston, Texas as a joint venture between Immatics and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) to develop next-generation adoptive cell therapies (ACT). He contributed significantly to raising the necessary funding including a $20m CPRIT grant by the State of Texas. As CSO, at Immatics US he leads a team that is responsible for Product Science, Process Development, Manufacturing, Quality Control and Program Management for Immatics’ cell therapy programs. Dr Walter is an inventor on numerous patents and patent applications and has co-authored more than 30 publications in prestigious peer-reviewed journals including Nature Medicine, Cell Reports, Brain and Blood. Dr Walter gained his PhD in Immunology from the University of Tuebingen, Germany.

Round Table 3: Cost Effective Scale-Up/Scale-Out Immunotherapy Manufacturing
Kevin Murray
Kevin Murray
Vice President, Global Sales
BioSpherix Medical
 
Kevin Murray
Kevin Murray
Vice President, Global Sales
BioSpherix Medical
 
About Speaker:

Sales Manager for BioSpherix, Ltd. BS BioChemistry, MBA Finance & Marketing, 20+ Years experience in the Pharmaceutical/Biotech/Medical Research Industry.

Round Table 4: Partnering Between Various Stake Holders, Including Patients and Patient Advocates
Erika  Brown
Erika Brown
President & Chief Executive Officer (And NED patient 15 years, Co-Founder for the TOM'S TRIALS Patient/Caregiver Groups in COLONTOWN)
PALTOWN Development Foundation
 
Erika  Brown
Erika Brown
President & Chief Executive Officer (And NED patient 15 years, Co-Founder for the TOM'S TRIALS Patient/Caregiver Groups in COLONTOWN)
PALTOWN Development Foundation
 
About Speaker:

Ms. Brown, a Montana native, had a healthy career as a corporate executive search professional until - at age 58 - she was diagnosed with late-stage colorectal cancer.  Treatment completed, her interests refocused upon the undeveloped niche of disease-specific patient empowerment.

Patient Power has taken a step forward with her founding of PALTOWN Development Foundation.  PALTOWN supports its first community - COLONTOWN, “where experience reaches out.” It is an  online community made up of deeply engaged, “wildly supportive”, experience-specific, secret support groups that are exclusively dedicated to CRC patients and family members.  COLONTOWN has become a model for patient community-building, creating a template for successful community for patients of other disease states to follow.

Brown is grateful, empowered, and disease-free - 15 years later.

Andrew  Vandergrift
Andrew Vandergrift
Patient Advocacy Liaison
Ignyta
 
Andrew  Vandergrift
Andrew Vandergrift
Patient Advocacy Liaison
Ignyta
 
About Speaker:
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5:55
Networking Reception & Poster Session
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Day 2 - Wednesday, January 31, 2018
 
7:15
Breakfast with Mentors from Academia & Industry
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Cytokines & Inflammation 2018
Targeting Cytokines for Therapeutic Interventions
Moderator: Stanley Perlman; Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
8:30
Optimizing Therapy in the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
 
Dermot  McGovern
Dermot McGovern
Joshua L. and Lisa Z. Greer Chair of Inflammatory Bowel genetics, Professor of Medicine
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine
About Speaker: Dermot McGovern completed his GI fellowship and obtained a PhD in complex disease genetics at the University of Oxford before moving to Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles almost 10 years ago. Dr McGovern’s clinical practice is in a tertiary referral center ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Dermot  McGovern
Dermot McGovern
Joshua L. and Lisa Z. Greer Chair of Inflammatory Bowel genetics, Professor of Medicine
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine
 
About Speaker:

Dermot McGovern completed his GI fellowship and obtained a PhD in complex disease genetics at the University of Oxford before moving to Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles almost 10 years ago. Dr McGovern’s clinical practice is in a tertiary referral center for complex IBD. Dr McGovern serves on the National Scientific Advisory Committee for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America as well as the steering committees of the National and International IBD Genetics Consortia. He also chairs the CCFA local advisory medical committee. His group is funded by the NIH to study the effect of genetics on the susceptibility to and natural history of IBD in diverse populations. Dr McGovern’s group analyze multi’-omic’ datasets to identify potential therapeutic targets of IBD that ‘feed’ the Drug Development Unit he co-directs. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and also the International Organization for the Study of IBD (IOIBD). Dr McGovern has recently been appointed the Director of the Cedars-Sinai Precision Medicine Initiative.

Immunogenicity & Immunotoxicity 2018
Molecular Mechanisms & Strategic Modulation of Immunogenicity
Moderator: Eszter Lazar-Molnar, Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology , University of Utah
8:30
Engineered Specific Regulatory T cells Block Adverse Immune Responses
 
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
About Speaker: David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, University of Chicago (MS) and Yale (PhD). Following a fellowship at Oxford Universit... Read Full Bio 
 
 
David  Scott
David W. Scott
Professor of Medicine & Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine (MED)
Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
 
About Speaker:

David W. Scott, Ph.D. is Vice Chair for Research, Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services School of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. An alumnus of Antioch College, University of Chicago (MS) and Yale (PhD). Following a fellowship at Oxford University, he held tenured positions at Duke University, University of Rochester, and University of Maryland Medical School. Dr. Scott has contributed to over 200 research papers on immunologic tolerance, and its application in autoimmune diseases, hemophilia and gene therapy. The author of two textbooks, including The Nature of Immunologic Tolerance, he ia recipient of a number of awards, e.g. Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Immunologists, a Boarhaave Professorship at Leiden University in Holland, and the 2009 Scientific Achievement Award from AAPS.

 
Abstract: Our lab has created and expanded huma...Read More 

Our lab has created and expanded human “natural” regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as cytotoxic T cells based on Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) therapy for cancer. These Tregs are rendered specific by expression of either a T-cell receptor (TCR), a single chain Fv (scFv) V region or a novel CAR derivative, called B-cell antibody receptors (BAR). These specific Tregs demonstrate potent suppression of T-cell and B-cell responses in two disease models, MS and hemophilia, in vitro and in vivo. These cells are stable, specific and potent. Our results are a platform to generate T cells that can be used to reduce immunogenicity and block adverse immune responses. Benefits include: * Specific as opposed to non-specific immunosuppression * Platform to reduce immunogenicity in multiple disease states * Ability to remove specific B cells * Reduction of T cell responses in presence of inflammation

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8:55
Targeting IL-17 in Neuroinflammation: More to it than Meets the Eye
 
Rachel  Caspi
Rachel Caspi
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
NEI, NIH
About Speaker: Dr. Caspi is is a tenured senior investigator, Section Head and Chief of the Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, NIH. She also holds an Adjunct Professorship at the University of Pennsylvannia Sch. Med. Dr. Caspi's research centers on i... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Rachel  Caspi
Rachel Caspi
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
NEI, NIH
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Caspi is is a tenured senior investigator, Section Head and Chief of the Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, NIH. She also holds an Adjunct Professorship at the University of Pennsylvannia Sch. Med. Dr. Caspi's research centers on immunology of the eye. A major direction is tolerance and autoimmunity to immunologically privileged retinal antigens in animal models of autoimmune uveitis, a potentially blinding human disease. She developed the mouse model of autoimmune uveitis, now in use worldwide. Her studies have elucidated many basic mechanisms of pathogenesis and helped to devise clinically relevant immunotherapeutic approaches. Her recent work emphasizes the Th17 response and the effects of the commensal microbiome on anti-retinal autoimmunity as well as on mucosal immunity and host defense at the ocular surface. She serves on journal Editorial Boards and is an organizer of ocular and general immunology conferences. Dr. Caspi is the recipient of the highly prestigious Friedenwald award and the Alcon Research Institute award, and has authored and co-authored over 240 publications.

 
Abstract: The Th17 response has been implicated...Read More 

The Th17 response has been implicated in CNS autoimmunity, but results of clinical targeting of IL-17A in autoimmune uveitis were disappointing. Furthermore, IL-17A injections ameliorated disease in mice immunized for uveitis. We addressed this paradox in a model of spontaneous autoimmune uveitis in R161H mice expressing a retina-specific TCR. Surprisingly, IL-17A deficient mice still developed disease and adoptively transferred IL-17A-/- R161H Th17 cells were pathogenic and produced enhanced level of other Th17 lineage-specific cytokines (IL-17F, IL-22 and GM-CSF) in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies indicated that IL-17A induced IL-24 in Th17 cells in an IL-17R-dependent fashion, via NFκB phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding to the IL-24 promoter, resulting in reduced expression of Th17 lineage cytokines. In vivo, IL-24 siRNA pre-treatment of transferred Th17 cells exacerbated, whereas IL-24 treatment of recipients ameliorated, uveitis. We conclude that IL-17A-induced IL-24 regulates production of other lineage-specific cytokines in Th17 cells, limiting their pathogenicity. Importantly, this regulatory pathway also appears to operate in humans. We speculate that loss of this pathway following IL-17A neutralization may have relevance to the poor outcome of clinical trials targeting IL-17 in uveitis and propose that augmentation of IL-24 could be explored as a therapeutic approach to inflammatory disease.

W-P. Chong1,2, K. Raychaudhuri1, R. Horai1, P.B. Silver1, Y. Jittayasothorn1, C-C. Chan1, J. Chen1,2, R.R. Caspi*1
 1NEI, National Institutes of Health, USA, 2ZOC, Sun Yat Sen University, China

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8:55
A 2nd Generation Vaccine for the Treatment of Glioblastoma—a Potential Role for Proteasome Catalyzed Peptide Splicing (PCPS)
 
Albert Wong
Albert J Wong
Professor, Cancer Biology Program, Neurosurgery
Stanford University Medical Center
About Speaker: Dr. Wong received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the Hopkins Oncology Center under Dr. Bert Vogelstein and then held faculty positions at the Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Thomas Jefferson Un... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Albert Wong
Albert J Wong
Professor, Cancer Biology Program, Neurosurgery
Stanford University Medical Center
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Wong received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the Hopkins Oncology Center under Dr. Bert Vogelstein and then held faculty positions at the Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Thomas Jefferson University before joining the Cancer Biology Program and the Dept. of Neurosurgery at Stanford University in 2005. Focusing on the causes and immunotherapy of human brain tumors, Dr. Wong has made several key discoveries, including the identification of the EGFRvIII alteration and the Gab1 signaling molecule. He showed that EGFRvIII can be used as a vaccine to treat brain tumors, which has led to several clinical trials. This led him to found the biotech company Alteris Therapeutics and as its President led its successful acquisition by Celldex Therapeutics. He has served on numerous review committees for the NIH and ACS, has been an advisor to several universities and pharmaceutical companies, and has been recognized with several honors, including Who’s Who in America, and finalist for regional Biotech Company of the Year.

 
Abstract: EGFRvIII is a potentially important t...Read More 

EGFRvIII is a potentially important target for precision medicine and immunotherapy. A tumor specific alteration of the EGF receptor, it is highly expressed in glioblastoma. We were intrigued that EGFRvIII might be present in cancer stem cells (CSCs). We showed that EGFRvIII is preferentially co-expressed with CD133, a widely used marker for CSC. We further show that EGFRvIII can be used to select for a CSC population with the highest self-renewal and tumorigenic properties. We developed an anti-EGFRvIII peptide vaccine for treating glioblastoma (Rindopepimut) that has shown significant clinical potential, receiving Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA for a Phase II trial in recurrent glioblastoma. However, a separate phase III study for newly diagnosed tumors was halted for futility. Interestingly, we created this vaccine before MHC binding principles were understood so the sequence was arbitrarily chosen and never optimized for immune response. The structure of the EGFRvIII peptide reveals the novel glycine at the fusion junction is not critical for immune recognition but perhaps important for secondary structure. We substituted the glycine by all 19 other amino acids. Several substitutions, including Tyr, Ala, Val, Pro, show >58% improved survival rate over Rindopepimut (n=16 or greater). All peptides elicited antibodies specific for EGFRvIII with a general trend towards high titer in the higher performing vaccines. CTL responses revealed that the highest performing vaccines were superior to Rindopepimut. Secondary structure is not important for MHC binding but is for processing by the proteasome. MS analysis of human immunoproteasome digests showed the highest performing vaccines consistently produced >19 cleavage products, including recombination to form a larger products at ~2600Da. Rindopepimut produced ~14 fragments with lower amounts of the 2600Da, while the poorest vaccines showed almost no cleavage and no 2600Da. Recently, it has been shown that PCPS may be responsible for >50% of presented antigens. Our results show that more robust vaccines against EGFRvIII can be produced, that 3D structure is important, and the vaccine shows unexpected complex processing and that PCPS may enhance a diverse T cell response against EGFRvIII. Further work is being performed to bring these vaccines to clinical trial.

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9:20
Benefits of Inhibiting Chemoattractant Receptors to ‘Dial Down’ Destructive Autoimmune Disease and ‘Dial Up’ the Anti-tumor Response in Cancer: Examples from Recent Clinical Studies
 
Thomas  Schall
Thomas Schall
President and Chief Executive Officer
ChemoCentryx
About Speaker: Dr. Schall is the founder of ChemoCentryx, Inc. and has served as the President, Chief Executive Officer and Director since the company commenced operations in 1997 and was appointed Chairman of the Board in April 2012. From 1993 to 1997, Dr. Schall ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Thomas  Schall
Thomas Schall
President and Chief Executive Officer
ChemoCentryx
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Schall is the founder of ChemoCentryx, Inc. and has served as the President, Chief Executive Officer and Director since the company commenced operations in 1997 and was appointed Chairman of the Board in April 2012. From 1993 to 1997, Dr. Schall worked at the DNAX Research Institute, a division of Schering-Plough Corporation. Prior to his work at the DNAX Research Institute, he worked as a scientist with Genentech, Inc. Dr. Schall participated in some of the earliest discoveries of chemokine system function and activities. Dr. Schall cloned one of the first chemokines to be discovered, and provided some of the earliest data for the existence of the previously unknown family of molecules which later came to be called the chemokines. Dr. Schall’s laboratories have been responsible for the discovery or co-discovery of a large percentage of all known chemokine receptors. Dr. Schall received his B.S. in biology from Northern Illinois University and his Ph.D. in cancer biology from Stanford University.

 
Abstract: Chemoattractant receptors (including ...Read More 

Chemoattractant receptors (including chemokine receptors and related receptors such as those for activated complement components) directly regulate the trafficking (migration), activation, and persistence of destructive and disease promoting cells in a variety of human pathologies. For example, in the orphan disease anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) vasculitis, neutrophils are driven to destroy vascular endothelial cells, leading to organ failure, especially in the kidney. These neutrophils are driven by high levels of the complement system fragment C5a (one of the most potent known chemoattractants and activators of neutrophils) binding to its receptor (C5aR).  In cancers, paradoxically, certain immune cells are specifically recruited by the action of chemokine receptors such as CCR2 into the tumor microenvironment.  CCR2 positive cells adopt an immune suppressive behavior in this microenvironment, protecting the nearby neoplastic cells from the body’s anti-tumor mechanisms. Using specific orally administered small molecule inhibitors of chemoattractant receptors we have provided clinical evidence that marked benefits can be achieved in ANCA vasculitis and pancreatic cancer via inhibition of C5aR and CCR2, respectively.  In ANCA vasculitis, avacopan (a potent and selective C5aR inhibitor) demonstrated benefits over the current standard of care treatment (SOC = high doses of corticosteroids combined with immunosuppressant). With avocopan therapy, ANCA patients achieved rapid and robust clinical response and remission, improvements in renal function parameters, and superior quality of life metrics compared to the SOC group. Separately, in pancreatic cancer we investigated whether improved patient survival could result from selectively inhibiting CCR2 with CCX872.  The study demonstrated an overall survival (OS) rate of 29% at 18 months with CCX872 and FOLFIRINOX combination therapy in all patients treated. The OS rate of 29% in the present study of CCX872 suggests a potential benefit when compared with previously published OS rates of 18.6% using FOLFIRINOX alone to treat pancreatic cancer patients with metastatic disease. Data from both these clinical studies illustrate the potential for substantial benefits – beyond current standards of care – of this new approach to chemoattractant-based precision therapy.    

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9:20
Mitigation of Immunogenicity with Tolerogenic Nanoparticles
 
Kei Kishimoto
Kei Kishimoto
Chief Scientific Officer
Selecta Biosciences
About Speaker: Dr. Kishimoto is the Chief Scientific Officer of Selecta Biosciences, a biotechnology company developing synthetic vaccines b ased on a novel self-assembling nanoparticle technology. Prior to joining Selecta, Dr. Kishimoto was Vice President of Resea... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Kei Kishimoto
Kei Kishimoto
Chief Scientific Officer
Selecta Biosciences
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Kishimoto is the Chief Scientific Officer of Selecta Biosciences, a biotechnology company developing synthetic vaccines b ased on a novel self-assembling nanoparticle technology. Prior to joining Selecta, Dr. Kishimoto was Vice President of Research at Momenta Pharmaceuticals where he led multidisciplinary teams in inflammation, oncology, and cardiovascular disease. Previously he was Senior Director of Inflammation Research at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, where he provid ed the scientific leadership for four programs in clinical development, and an Associate Director of Immunology at Boehringer Ingelheim. Dr. Kishimoto receive d his doctoral degree in Immunology from Harvard University and his post-doctoral training at Stanford University.

 
Abstract: The context in which dendritic cells ...Read More 

The context in which dendritic cells encounter antigen can determine the outcome of the immune response. Conventional vaccines provide antigen in the context of an adjuvant to stimulate antigen-specific immune responses. We have recently engineered nanoparticles to present antigen in the context of a tolerogenic signal provided by rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. These self-assembling, biodegradable synthetic vaccine particles containing rapamycin (SVP-Rapamycin) together with either co-encapsulated antigen or admixed with free antigen inhibit the activation of antigen-specific T cells and B cells through the induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells in vivo. Tolerance induction is dependent on the encapsulation of rapamycin, as free rapamycin is ineffective. We have demonstrated therapeutic protection as well as adoptive transfer of tolerance in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We have also applied the use of these SVP-Rapamycin to prevent the formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) to biologic therapies. The development of ADAs is a common cause for treatment failure and adverse events, such as hypersensitivity reactions, associated with biologic therapies. We have demonstrated the functional benefit of immune tolerance induction with a variety of biologic drugs, including coagulation factor VIII in a model of hemophilia A, anti-TNF monoclonal antibody in a model of spontaneous arthritis, pegylated uricase in uricase deficient mice and in nonhuman primates, immunotoxins in a model of mesothelioma, and adeno-associated vectors used in gene therapy. Currently a pegylated uricase enzyme in combination with SVP-Rapamycin is being evaluated in a multi-center Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with symptomatic gout and hyperuricemia. Initial data from the Phase 1 and Phase 2 trials will be presented.

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9:45
Targeting the Cytokine Driven Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis
 
Michael  Howell
Michael Howell
Senior Director of Translational Sciences
Incyte Corporation
About Speaker: Michael Howell currently works as the Senior Director of Translational Research at the Incyte Corporation with a focus on immunological diseases. Dr. Howell received his PhD in Immunology from the West Virginia University School of Medicine and then ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Michael  Howell
Michael Howell
Senior Director of Translational Sciences
Incyte Corporation
 
About Speaker:

Michael Howell currently works as the Senior Director of Translational Research at the Incyte Corporation with a focus on immunological diseases. Dr. Howell received his PhD in Immunology from the West Virginia University School of Medicine and then moved onto National Jewish Medical and Research Center where he transitioned from a post doctoral fellow to Assistant Professor in the Division of Allergy and Immunology. While at NJMRC, he served as a Co-Investigator for the Atopic Dermatitis Vaccinia Network and made seminal discoveries in the role of Th2 cytokines on the barrier and innate immune responses of atopic dermatitis patients. Since transitioning to industry, Dr. Howell has held positions at Boehringer Ingelheim, the Immune Tolerance Network, MedImmune, and Incyte. Throughout his career, Dr. Howell has combined clinical and basic science approaches to evaluate inflammatory diseases. This research has been highlighted in national and international meetings, peer-reviewed publications and reviews on immunologic mechanisms and has led to recent patent applications for therapeutic interventions and biomarker strategies in inflammatory diseases.

 
Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic i...Read More 

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects up to 25% of children and 10% of adults. AD is characterized by significant disruption of the epidermal barrier, increased cutaneous and systemic inflammation, and an impaired quality-of-life. Additionally, AD is often associated with an increased risk for allergen sensitization and skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. Current management of AD is aimed at suppressing the inflammatory response and restoring the barrier function of the skin; reducing exacerbations; and preventing secondary skin infections. Combinations of treatment strategies are used to alleviate symptoms of the disease; however, resolution is often temporary, and long-term usage of some of the medications for AD can be associated with significant side effects. Monoclonal antibodies and novel small molecules may provide more consistent benefit to patients with AD by specifically targeting immune and molecular pathways important for the pathogenesis of AD. In this presentation, we’ll review the state of the art therapeutic approaches targeting the inflammatory axes in AD.

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9:45
Therapeutic Protein Immunogenicity Risk: Prediction, Validation and Mitigation
 
Frances Terry
Frances Terry

EpiVax
About Speaker: Frances Terry is the Director of Analysis at EpiVax, Inc. Ms. Terry obtained her Master of Public Health degree at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. At EpiVax, she oversees statistical and bioinformatics-based analysis of wet and dry lab ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Frances Terry
Frances Terry

EpiVax
 
About Speaker:

Frances Terry is the Director of Analysis at EpiVax, Inc. Ms. Terry obtained her Master of Public Health degree at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. At EpiVax, she oversees statistical and bioinformatics-based analysis of wet and dry lab projects focused on immunogenicity prediction for therapeutic proteins and development of genome-derived vaccines.

 
Abstract: New biologics face many research and ...Read More 

New biologics face many research and development hurdles through the pipeline, not the least of which is the potential for unwanted immune response. This presentation will compare prevailing methods to evaluate immunogenicity risk and review recent data from Europe’s Abirisk Consortium. We will explore prediction of effector and regulatory T cell epitopes (Tregitopes) in silico, ranking of biologic candidates by T cell epitope content and humanness, in vitro validation studies, and potential sources of discordance across methodologies.

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10:10
Morning Networking Break
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Cytokines & Inflammation 2018
Innate Immunity in Respiratory Diseases
Moderator: Michael Howell; Senior Director of Translational Sciences
10:40
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Insights into Role of Type 1 Interferon
 
Stanley  Perlman
Stanley Perlman
Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
University of Iowa
About Speaker: Dr. Perlman currently investigates the pathogenesis of coronavirus-mediated severe human respiratory disease (severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and of coronavirus-induced demyelination. His labor... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Stanley  Perlman
Stanley Perlman
Professor, Microbiology and Immunology
University of Iowa
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Perlman currently investigates the pathogenesis of coronavirus-mediated severe human respiratory disease (severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and of coronavirus-induced demyelination. His laboratory also has a strong interest in the regulatory T cells in the context of infection. He has developed severe animal models for the study of MERS and has also investigated T cell responses in MERS survivors. Prior to joining the faculty of the University of Iowa in 1983, he obtained his Ph.D. at M.I.T. and his M.D. at the University of Miami.

 
Abstract: Highly pathogenic human respiratory c...Read More 

Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses (CoV) cause acute lethal disease characterized by an exuberant inflammatory response and severe lung damage. However, the precise factors that lead to lung pathology are not well understood. Here, we used mice infected with the coronavirus that causes the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). In order to study these mice, we developed several infection systems in which receptor is provided exogenously because mice are naturally resistant to infection with MERS-CoV. Using mice in which the human receptor replaces the mouse receptor (hDDP4 replaces mDPP4, hDPP4-KI mice) and virus adapted to cause severe disease in these mice, we show that Type I interferon (IFN-I) is required for protection and for virus clearance. This is in marked contrast to mice infected with another highly pathogenic respiratory human coronavirus, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), where disease is ameliorated in mice in the absence of IFN-I. In these mice, IFN-I expression was delayed compared to the kinetics of virus replication. Delayed IFN-I signaling promoted the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages, which caused an elevation in lung cytokine/chemokine levels, extensive vascular leakage and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Early IFN-I protected SARS-CoV-infected mice from severe disease. In contrast, IFN and virus titers reached peak titers at the same time after infection. These results demonstrate the importance of timing of endogenous IFN-I expression relative to virus replication, in terms of outcomes. Exogenously delivered IFN-I has had mixed effects when administered to MERS patients therapeutically. Our results may explain some of this variability, indicating that timing of IFN-I administration must be carefully considered relative to the disease course and kinetics of virus replication. Benefits of this presentation: 1. To understand the pathogenesis of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. 2. To gain insight into the various murine models used for the study of pathogenic human coronaviruses. 3. To understand some of the differences between the infections caused by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. 4. To understand the relationship between virus replication and endogenously produced or exogenously administered IFN-I and how this differs in the context of SARS versus MERS.

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Immunogenicity & Immunotoxicity 2018
Immunogenicity Assessment of Novel Drug Candidates & Biosimilars
Moderator: Frances Terry, Director of Analysis, EpiVax
10:40
Challenges and Solutions in Immunogenicity Assessment of Novel Drug Candidates
 
Meina  Liang
Meina Liang
Director, Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis
MedImmune
About Speaker: Dr. Meina Liang has broad experiences in drug development of small molecule and biologics across therapeutic areas, including antibody-drug conjugate and immunotherapy. Dr. Liang is currently director of Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis at Medimmu... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Meina  Liang
Meina Liang
Director, Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis
MedImmune
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Meina Liang has broad experiences in drug development of small molecule and biologics across therapeutic areas, including antibody-drug conjugate and immunotherapy. Dr. Liang is currently director of Clinical Immunology and Bioanalysis at Medimmune, a subsidiary of AstraZeneca. She leads a centralized functional group supporting Medimmune portfolio from preclinical to post marketing, responsible for biomarker development for pharmacodynamics and patient stratification, pharmacokinetics bioanalysis for exposure-response evaluation, in vitro cytokine release testing for safety assessment, and immunogenicity assessment for regulatory submission. Her group also contributes to investigation of mechanism of action and lead selection of candidate drugs as well as development of companion diagnostics. Dr. Liang manages a GLP laboratory and also plays a DMPK project leader role for safety studies and clinical trials. She contributes to global regulatory interactions and submissions, including INDs, CTAs, IMPDs and BLAs.

Prior to joining Medimmune, Dr. Liang was a senior scientist at Abgenix, leading a centralized antibody-screening group for lead selection and characterization of therapeutic antibodies. Before Abgenix, Dr. Liang was a scientist at Berlex Biosciences, supporting small molecule drug discovery and development and played a key role in advancing a chemokine project from concept to clinical trials.

Dr. Liang holds B.S in Pharmacy from Peking University Medical School in China and Ph.D in Pharmacology from Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received postdoctoral training from University of Virginia. Dr. Liang is a co-inventor for a number of patents, has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and has been invited to present at many international conferences.

 
Abstract: Immunogenicity assessment is ...Read More 

Immunogenicity assessment is a requirement for biopharmaceutics registration. It is often evaluated in clinical studies as a secondary endpoint. Novel drug modalities may present unique bioanalytical and/or strategical considerations that should be incorporated into immunogenicity testing plan. In this presentation, we will use case examples to discuss approaches to overcome challenges to enable accurate immunogenicity reporting and clinical impact assessment.

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11:05
Lung Tissue Resident Memory T cells in Immunity to Respiratory Pathogens
 
Kingston   Mills
Kingston HG Mills
Professor of Experimental Immunology
Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute
About Speaker: Kingston Mills is Professor of Experimental Immunology, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute (TBSI), Trinity College Dublin (TCD). He is Head of the Immunology, Inflammation and Infection research theme at TCD ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Kingston   Mills
Kingston HG Mills
Professor of Experimental Immunology
Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute
 
About Speaker:

Kingston Mills is Professor of Experimental Immunology, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute (TBSI), Trinity College Dublin (TCD). He is Head of the Immunology, Inflammation and Infection research theme at TCD and Head of the Centre for the Study of Immunology in TBSI. He trained at as a Postdoctoral Fellow at University College London and the MRC National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London (now the Crick Institute), before joining the Scientific Staff of National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), Herts, UK. He was appointed to a Personal Chair at TCD in 2001 and was Head of the School of Biochemistry and Immunology from 2008-2011. He is a co-founder of University spin-out companies Opsona Therapeutics and TriMod Therapeutics. His research focuses on the role of the immune system, in particular T cell subtypes, in immunity to infection, cancer and autoimmunity.

 
Abstract: A recently identified subpopulation o...Read More 

A recently identified subpopulation of memory T cells, that reside in peripheral tissues and do not recirculate, have been termed tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells. TRM cells that express CD69 or CD69 and CD103 (αEβ7 integrin) provide a first line of defence against infection at mucosal surfaces, responding rapidly without a need for recruitment of T cells from the circulation. TRM cells that reside in the epithelial tissues of a mucosal site are specific for pathogens previously encountered at that mucosal tissue. It has also been suggested that TRM cells may non-specifically expand in tissues during infection with an unrelated pathogen and may therefore function like innate immune cells. We have examined the role of innate and adaptive immune responses in protection against the respiratory pathogen Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis is a re-emerging infectious disease despite the introduction of safer acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines that have replaced the reactogenic whole cell pertussis (wP) vaccines in most developed countries. However aP vaccines are less effective and fail to sustain protective immunity, probably because of their limited ability to induce immunological memory. Studies in animal models have shown that innate immune mechanisms, involving dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells and antimicrobial peptides help to control primary infection with B. pertussis, while complete bacterial clearance requires cellular immunity mediated by Th1 and Th17 cells. Protective adaptive immunity against B. pertussis generated by previous infection or immunization with a wP vaccine appears to be mediated largely by Th1 cells and opsonizing antibody, with a smaller role for Th17 cells. In contrast, the less efficacious alum-adjuvanted aP vaccine induce strong toxin-neutralizing antibodies, Th2 and Th17 cells but have limited ability to induce Th1 cells. Furthermore, wP are more effective than aP in generating lung TRM cells that maintain long term immunity against infection in the respiratory tract. We have demonstrated that formulation of aP vaccines with TLR and STING agonists as adjuvants enhances induction of Th1/Th17 and TRM cells in mice, especially when delivered by the nasal route and this improves their efficacy over alum-adjuvanted injectable vaccines. Vaccine that induce TRM cells as well as Th1/Th17 cells are likely to hold the key to long term protection against a range of respiratory pathogens in humans.

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11:05
Expanding the Utility of a Functional Reporter Gene Assay to Clinical Monitoring of TNF Antagonist Biosimilars
 
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Immunology Medical Director
ARUP Laboratories
About Speaker: Dr. Lazar-Molnar is an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in biological sciences at the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary and completed a postdoctoral fellows... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Eszter Lazar-Molnar
Immunology Medical Director
ARUP Laboratories
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Lazar-Molnar is an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in biological sciences at the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Stanley G. Nathenson at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York, where she was studying immune regulation through costimulatory molecules and finding new ways for designing immunotherapy. She was the recipient of a Cancer Research Institute postdoctoral fellowship and the Belfer Outstanding Postdoctoral Research Award in 2009. She completed a clinical immunology fellowship at the University of Utah and is currently a medical director in Immunology at ARUP and assistant director of the Histocompatibility & Immunogenetics Laboratory at the University of Utah. Her research interests include cellular immunology, immunotherapy, and transplantation immunology. Dr. Lazar-Molnar is board certified by the American Board of Medical Laboratory Immunology (ABMLI) and American Board of Histocompatibility and Immunologenetics (ABHI).

 
Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonis...Read More 

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists are increasingly used in clinical practice for the treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Infliximab (IFX) is a chimeric mouse/human IgG1 kappa monoclonal antibody to TNF, which is FDA approved for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis), rheumatoid arthritis, and others. Recently biosimilars have been introduced with the goal of reducing treatment costs and increasing access to therapy for patients. The first anti-TNF biosimilar, infliximab-dyyb (Inflectra, Remsima) has been approved in the US since 04/05/2016, and is increasingly becoming available for clinical use.

Immunogenicity of protein based drugs such as TNF antagonists and their biosimilars is a major factor limiting clinical efficacy and safety, and it primarily manifests in the production of anti-drug antibodies (ADA). The appearance of ADA to TNF antagonists is associated with reduced clinical efficacy, relapse of symptoms and increased risk of adverse events. Up to 70% of patients initially responding to the drug may develop treatment failure upon prolonged treatment. Moreover, the appearance of ADA is associated with declining, or disappearing drug levels. Validation of a functional, cell-based reporter gene assay previously developed for infliximab is presented, allowing for the measurement of the biosimilar infliximab-dyyb, and detection of neutralizing antibodies to IFX-dyyb. Laboratory testing to measure drug and ADA levels are clinically available and provide essential tools for managing patients with treatment failure to TNF antagonists.

 

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11:30
Regulation of Airway Inflammation, Homeostasis and Novel Mechanisms of Innate Immunity
 
Ignacio  Juncadella
Ignacio Juncadella
Principal Scientist, Immunology and Respiratory Research
Boehringer Ingelheim
About Speaker: Ignacio J. Juncadella currently works as a principal scientist and project leader in the department of Immunology and Respiratory Disease Research at Boehhringer Ingelheim, Inc. His research primarily focuses on the identification and validation of t... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Ignacio  Juncadella
Ignacio Juncadella
Principal Scientist, Immunology and Respiratory Research
Boehringer Ingelheim
 
About Speaker:

Ignacio J. Juncadella currently works as a principal scientist and project leader in the department of Immunology and Respiratory Disease Research at Boehhringer Ingelheim, Inc. His research primarily focuses on the identification and validation of therapeutic concepts related to inflammation, autoimmunity and fibrotic pathways in human disease. Ignacio obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2008. Ignacio joined Boehringer Ingelheim after his postdoctoral training with Dr. Kodi S. Ravichandran at the University of Virginia where he studied mechanisms of tissue tolerance and homeostasis, innate immunity and how defects in apoptotic cell clearance, a process call ‘efferocytosis’ results in exacerbated lung inflammation.

 
Abstract: Many chronic lung diseases such as as...Read More 

Many chronic lung diseases such as asthma and COPD are associated with defects in clearance of apoptotic cells, a process call ‘efferocytosis’. Exposure to pollutants, allergens or pathogens such as respiratory viruses can induce cell death in the airways and are associated with acute exacerbations. Failure to clear death cells results in the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), inflammatory mediators which contribute to the development of chronic inflammation, disease exacerbations and possibly disease progression. Using several methodologies, we recently demonstrated the ability of airway epithelial cells to regulate airway inflammation to allergens owning to their ability to engulf and clear apoptotic epithelial cells. Furthermore, the ability of lung epithelial cells to clear death cells is influenced by a novel mechanism involving macrophages redirection of phagocytosis through micro-vesicle dependent communication.

Another area of interest is the regulation of viral immunity. Expression of inflammatory genes is post-transcriptionally regulated and requires nuclear export proteins for translation. The role of nuclear export protein in innate immunity is poorly understood. Through an unbiased proteomic and RNAi screens, we identified the nuclear export protein NXF1 as a novel regulator of IRF5 signaling. Further understanding of this novel pathway may provide useful insights on future therapeutic aimed at blocking viral induced exacerbations.

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11:30
The Use of Non-Clinical Assessments in Immunogenicity Risk-Assessment During Drug Development
 
Zuben Sauna
Zuben Sauna
Principal Investigator, Haematology, Research and Review
CBER, FDA
About Speaker: Zuben Sauna is a Principal Investigator and a Reviewer at the US Food and Drug Administration. His research interests lie in understanding the pharmacogenetic basis of the immune response to proteins used in therapeutic interventions as these affect ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Zuben Sauna
Zuben Sauna
Principal Investigator, Haematology, Research and Review
CBER, FDA
 
About Speaker:

Zuben Sauna is a Principal Investigator and a Reviewer at the US Food and Drug Administration. His research interests lie in understanding the pharmacogenetic basis of the immune response to proteins used in therapeutic interventions as these affect efficacy and safety. His laboratory exploits a combination of computational, in vitro and ex vivo approaches to understand why some individuals and/or sub-populations develop immune responses while others do not. His work has published extensively in high impact journals such as Nature Biotechnology, Nature Medicine, Science, Science Translational Medicine and Nature Reviews Genetics. He received his Ph.D. from Poona University, India with subsequent training at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, USA.

 
Abstract: Immunogenicity (development of anti-d...Read More 

Immunogenicity (development of anti-drug antibodies) is a significant impediment to development and licensure of any therapeutic-protein. The current paradigm is that most reliable immunogenicity assessments can only be made during phase 3 clinical trials and these are discussed in several Guidance Documents from regulatory agencies and White Papers from industry. Immunogenicity is a key safety issue and can lead to discontinuation of drug development, thus decisions made late in the drug development cycle add considerably to the drug development costs and put trial subjects at risk. The last few years have seen considerable advances in tools for the non-clinical assessments of immunogenicity. I will discuss these and illustrate how they may be applied using real-world examples. The presentation will cover the following key topics: • The importance of immunogenicity during drug development and overview of regulatory Guidance Documents and White Papers that are available. • Two important concepts in immunogenicity risk assessment (with examples): (i) The ability to distinguish between validating a specific method and predicting clinical immunogenicity. (ii) Estimating the probability of anti-drug development vs. the consequences if such antibodies are generated. • Steps in the immune response to therapeutic proteins that can be measured/evaluated and examples of how they have been used to predict clinical outcomes. • Engineered protein therapeutics have neo-sequences introduced into them. How can one assess whether these may be neo-epitopes? If so, how does one mitigate the risk prior to starting clinical trials? • Many in silico predictions, in vitro measurements and ex vivo assays rely on the use of peptides. A drawback of such an approach is the underlying assumption that the peptides of interest will be generated from the full-length protein therapeutic. This is not necessarily true. The MAPPs assay is challenging to perform but provides valuable information about BOTH the generation and presentation of peptides by antigen presenting cells (APCs). I will provide new, unpublished data demonstrating that peptides identified on APCs from the same set of subjects differ when the cells are exposed to different protein products which have the same amino-acid sequence.

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11:55
 
Alison  Humbles
Alison Humbles
Fellow, Principal Scientist
MedImmune
About Speaker: ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Alison  Humbles
Alison Humbles
Fellow, Principal Scientist
MedImmune
 
About Speaker:
11:55
Managing Unwanted Immune Responses to Biopharmaceuticals Including Utilization of MHC-Associated Peptide Proteomics (MAPPs)
 
Gary Bembridge
Gary Bembridge
Senior Director Scientific Affairs
ABZENA
About Speaker: Gary has 20+ years' experience working in the biopharmaceutical sector. Since joining Abzena in 2013 Gary has managed business development activities associated with immunological responses to biotherapeutics ensuring that immunogenicity assessment a... Read Full Bio 
 
 
Gary Bembridge
Gary Bembridge
Senior Director Scientific Affairs
ABZENA
 
About Speaker:

Gary has 20+ years' experience working in the biopharmaceutical sector. Since joining Abzena in 2013 Gary has managed business development activities associated with immunological responses to biotherapeutics ensuring that immunogenicity assessment and bespoke immunological studies are tailored to partner’s needs.  Prior to this Gary worked at Envigo as a Biopharmaceutical Product Development Manager and shared responsibility for designing safety studies and non-clinical development programmes for all biologics, providing scientific support and advice to the immunology department. Previous roles at GSK’s included Biology Leader investigating the immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccines, molecular adjuvants and anti-inflammatory antagonist mAbs where he co-authored several patents in these fields.  Gary completed his PhD from the University of Bristol, Department of Veterinary Medicine.

 
Abstract: Unwanted immunogenicity can hamper bi...Read More 

Unwanted immunogenicity can hamper biopharmaceutical drug development impacting upon safety, efficacy and costs. A number of approaches can be utilized to mitigate unwanted immunogenicity in the pre-clinical development phase including in silico and in vitro T cell assays that focus on the identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes in the sequence of therapeutic proteins.  Biopharmaceuticals that target T cells directly and induce T cell proliferation may confound the proliferation observed through immunogenicity in a PBMC based assay.  In these instances a DC:T cell assay may be  more appropriate, potentially avoiding direct T cell pharmacology and only presenting linear peptides derived from the biologic to T cells.  However, biologics [bi-specific molecules] that target T cells with one specificity and can target or tether to the surface of DC cells depending upon the second specificity may confound this [DC:T] approach too. Such molecules can exhibit pharmacological activity when autologous T cells are re-introduced into the assay. In these instances consideration of testing each arm individually or T cell epitope mapping the variable domains are options to consider.  A final alternative strategy, for such molecules, would be to assess the naturally processed and presented peptides identified by MAPPs in a T cell peptide assay.  Only by understanding the MOA of the biologic will it be possible to elect an appropriate assay format from the existing range of assays or indeed develop new assays as appropriate.

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Lunch Panel Discussion: Experiences & Perspectives on Real Life Application of Immunotherapies

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12:20
Erika  Brown
Erika Brown
President & Chief Executive Officer (And NED patient 15 years, Co-Founder for the TOM'S TRIALS Patient/Caregiver Groups in COLONTOWN)
PALTOWN Development Foundation
 
Erika  Brown
Erika Brown
President & Chief Executive Officer (And NED patient 15 years, Co-Founder for the TOM'S TRIALS Patient/Caregiver Groups in COLONTOWN)
PALTOWN Development Foundation
 
About Speaker:

Ms. Brown, a Montana native, had a healthy career as a corporate executive search professional until - at age 58 - she was diagnosed with late-stage colorectal cancer.  Treatment completed, her interests refocused upon the undeveloped niche of disease-specific patient empowerment.

Patient Power has taken a step forward with her founding of PALTOWN Development Foundation.  PALTOWN supports its first community - COLONTOWN, “where experience reaches out.” It is an  online community made up of deeply engaged, “wildly supportive”, experience-specific, secret support groups that are exclusively dedicated to CRC patients and family members.  COLONTOWN has become a model for patient community-building, creating a template for successful community for patients of other disease states to follow.

Brown is grateful, empowered, and disease-free - 15 years later.

Jamie Reno
Jamie Reno
Investigative Reporter
Healthline Media
 
Jamie Reno
Jamie Reno
Investigative Reporter
Healthline Media
 
About Speaker:

Jamie Reno is a modern-day Renaissance man who is motivated by compassion and by looking beyond political, racial, socio-economic and national boundaries to find common ground. Jamie is one of America’s most accomplished investigative reporters. He’s also an acclaimed author, award-winning singer-songwriter-guitarist, and tireless national and global advocate for cancer patients and their families. Jamie is also a relentless supporter of war veterans, and kids. He’s a three-time survivor of stage IV cancer.

Jamie was a national correspondent for 20 years with Newsweek, where he covered 9/11, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, veterans, the White House, cancer breakthroughs, China, and more. He’s also edited and written for such publications as the New York Times, Sports Illustrated, International Business Times, Yahoo Finance, Daily Beast, Healthline, People, Entertainment Weekly, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, and his acclaimed news blog The Reno Dispatch. Jamie has won more than 150 writing awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Press Club, and is a four-time winner of the Press Club’s top Best of Show award. Jamie is now an investigative reporter for Healthline, America’s second largest health news site with 80 million monthly visitors.

Recognized for his coverage of America’s veterans, Jamie’s reporting has highlighted and improved the lives of our former warriors suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress (PTSD) and other emotional and physical wounds of war. The lead reporter on the groundbreaking Newsweek investigative series on the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Jamie, along with his colleagues, earned the Magazine Award for General Excellence, the highest honor in magazine journalism.

A three-time, 21-year survivor of stage IV non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Jamie is one of the world’s most respected and effective advocates for cancer patients and their families. Jamie has partnered on educational and empowering patient-focused projects with such organizations as the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Lymphoma Research Foundation, The Children’s Treehouse Foundation, Steps for Living, Greg Wolf Fund, American Cancer Society, Cancer Care, the Asian Heritage Society and Vital Options International.

Jamie is also a gifted author whose book, Hope Begins in the Dark, is the most popular book ever written about lymphoma. An all-new, groundbreaking edition is scheduled for 2018.

Jamie’s new novel, Snowman on the Pitcher’s Mound, which is receiving glowing reviews, tells the poignant story of a 10-year-old boy who loves baseball and whose mother has been diagnosed with cancer. Jamie is publishing the novel as part of his new Pitcher’s Mound Project for children who have a parent with cancer. He is partnering on this initiative with the Children’s Treehouse Foundation, an esteemed nonprofit 501c3 organization based in Ciolorado.

The Treehouse Foundation’s CLIMB Program for kids who have a parent with cancer is already in 77 American cancer hospitals. The goal for Jamie and the Treehouse Foundation with this new initiative is to get these invaluable resources for families into more than 1,000 cancer hospitals in the US and around the world.

In his “other life,” Jamie is a popular singer-songwriter-guitarist who had a major-label record deal and who has performed and recorded his life-affirming songs with such legendary music artists as Peter Frampton, Charlie Daniels, and members of The Eagles, Chicago, The Beach Boys family, Poco, The Allman Brothers, The Doobie Brothers, Little River Band and Steely Dan. He earned a Best Song award from the San Diego Songwriter’s Guild’s Annual Song Contest.

Told when he was diagnosed with cancer that he would live three years, Jamie is an eternal optimist who has dedicated much of his life to urging and inspiring others who are facing adversity to keep fighting and keep smiling. Jamie was named Survivor of the Year by the Greg Wolf Fund, an organization dedicated to funding research in the fight against blood cancers and helping young cancer patients and their families, and won the San Diego Press Club’s special Drew Silvern Award for his journalism about and for cancer patients.

Jamie studied journalism and political science at San Diego State University, and studied marketing and media at Santa Barbara City College, where he was a debate captain and head of the poli-sci club and on the National Honor Roll. Jamie’s goals are to continue facilitating his diverse talents and vast resources to further advocate for and spread positive messages around the world to cancer patients and their families, war veterans and children.

Jamie lives in San Diego with his wife, Gabriela, and their daughter, Mandy.

Jamie Reno

858-397-4950

jreno@san.rr.com (email)

sdsufan2000@gmail.com (email)

10488 Orozco Road

San Diego,  CA  92124

http://therenodispatch.blogspot.com/2016/01/historic-china-cancer-conference-in.html  (national news blog)

http://pitchersmound.org/reviews.html  (new novel for families)

http://www.hopebeginsinthedark.com (global cancer survivors book) 

http://www.jamiereno.com (music site)

http://www.ibtimes.com/reporters/jamie-reno (International Business Times)

http://www.newsweek.com/authors/jamie-reno  (Newsweek) 

http://www.sbcc.edu/prospective/studentbios/jamie.php (college honors)

http://www.thedailybeast.com/contributors/jamie-reno.html (the daily beast) 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamie-reno-7bb4b310/ (LinkedIn)

Aaron  Miller
Aaron Miller
Assistant Clinical Professor
University of California San Diego
 
Aaron  Miller
Aaron Miller
Assistant Clinical Professor
University of California San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Aaron M. Miller, MD, PhD, is a board-certified medical oncologist who specializes in diagnosing and treating gastrointestinal cancers. This includes cancers of the esophagus, gallbladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, bowel and anus. He uses numerous forms of therapy such as chemotherapy, biological therapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy to offer the best possible treatment options for his patients. Dr. Miller’s approach to care emphasizes personalized medicine/precision oncology, adoptive cellular therapy, next-generation tumor sequencing and tumor immunology. He is part of the gastrointestinal cancer unit at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, where he works alongside a multidisciplinary team to provide patients with highly specialized care.

Dr. Miller is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, where he instructs medical students, residents and fellows at UC San Diego School of Medicine. He holds a joint faculty appointment at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and is actively involved in cancer research, with the aim of translating his discoveries in the lab into new ways of treating patients. 

Specifically, Dr. Miller’s research focuses on tumor neoantigen identification as targets for novel immunotherapeutics that are both effective and avoid off-tumor toxicities. He and his colleagues have also created a new patient-derived xenograft platform that allows for preclinical testing of investigational chemotherapeutics and immune therapies.

Preet Chaudhary
Preet Chaudhary
Chief of Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for Study of Blood Diseases, Director of Blood and Marrow Transplant Program
University of Southern California, Los Angeles
 
Preet Chaudhary
Preet Chaudhary
Chief of Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for Study of Blood Diseases, Director of Blood and Marrow Transplant Program
University of Southern California, Los Angeles
 
About Speaker:

Preet M. Chaudhary, M.D., Ph.D. is chief of the Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for the study of Blood Diseases in the Department of Medicine, and coleader of the Molecular Genetics Program at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. He is also Professor of Medicine, Ronald H. Bloom Family Chair in Lymphoma Research, and Program Director of the USC/Norris Blood and Marrow Transplant Program. Current research work in Dr. Chaudhary's laboratory is focused on chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells for the treatment of cancer.

Deborah Goldberg
Deborah Goldberg
Patient
Stage IV Colorectal Cancer Patient
 
Deborah Goldberg
Deborah Goldberg
Patient
Stage IV Colorectal Cancer Patient
 
About Speaker:

Deborah Goldberg grew up in Portland, Oregon where she met her childhood sweetheart, a German exchange student. They have been married for 22 years and have 3 amazing children. She received a BA from Brown University and a JD from UCLA. She practiced law for many years. Then, after loosing her beloved mother and mother-in-law to cancer, she was diagnosed with Stage IV cancer and has been a patient at the Stanford Cancer Center since 2014.

Moderator
Kamala  Maddali
Kamala Maddali
Vice President, Biopharm Collaborations and Companion Diagnostics
Cancer Genetics, Inc.
 
Kamala  Maddali
Kamala Maddali
Vice President, Biopharm Collaborations and Companion Diagnostics
Cancer Genetics, Inc.
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Maddali is currently Vice President, Biopharma Collaborations, Market Development and Companion Diagnostics at Cancer Genetics Inc. In addition, Dr. Maddali is the Vice Chair of the Philadelphia Chapter of Women in Bio. She is also a Scientific Advisory Member for International Cancer Advocacy Network. Her background includes time at Quest Diagnostics, Quintiles and Merck Schering Plough in the arena of biomarkers and companion diagnostics. Dr. Maddali holds a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from University of Missouri-Columbia and a DVM from Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University in India. Dr. Maddali loves to travel with her family which includes her husband, Vamsi and son, Venkat. She enjoys music and watching cartoons at her leisure and engaging in many non-profit activities to create cancer awareness.

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Keynote Panel
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2:45
Andrew  Vandergrift
Andrew Vandergrift
Patient Advocacy Liaison
Ignyta
 
Andrew  Vandergrift
Andrew Vandergrift
Patient Advocacy Liaison
Ignyta
 
About Speaker:
Erika  Brown
Erika Brown
President & Chief Executive Officer (And NED patient 15 years, Co-Founder for the TOM'S TRIALS Patient/Caregiver Groups in COLONTOWN)
PALTOWN Development Foundation
 
Erika  Brown
Erika Brown
President & Chief Executive Officer (And NED patient 15 years, Co-Founder for the TOM'S TRIALS Patient/Caregiver Groups in COLONTOWN)
PALTOWN Development Foundation
 
About Speaker:

Ms. Brown, a Montana native, had a healthy career as a corporate executive search professional until - at age 58 - she was diagnosed with late-stage colorectal cancer.  Treatment completed, her interests refocused upon the undeveloped niche of disease-specific patient empowerment.

Patient Power has taken a step forward with her founding of PALTOWN Development Foundation.  PALTOWN supports its first community - COLONTOWN, “where experience reaches out.” It is an  online community made up of deeply engaged, “wildly supportive”, experience-specific, secret support groups that are exclusively dedicated to CRC patients and family members.  COLONTOWN has become a model for patient community-building, creating a template for successful community for patients of other disease states to follow.

Brown is grateful, empowered, and disease-free - 15 years later.

Scott  Durum
Scott Durum
Chief, Section of Cytokines and Immunity
NIH - National Cancer Center - Center for Cancer Research
 
Scott  Durum
Scott Durum
Chief, Section of Cytokines and Immunity
NIH - National Cancer Center - Center for Cancer Research
 
About Speaker:

Scott Durum trained in immunology at Wake Forest, Oak Ridge, National Jewish and Yale before coming to the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. His lab has been interested in the IL-7 pathway for a number of years. Recently, together with collaborators, they found that this is a major pathway driving Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, the most common cancer in children. They are working to develop therapeutics directed against the IL-7 pathway in this disease.

Gordon Freeman
Gordon Freeman
Professor, Department of Medical Oncology, Professor of Medicine
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University
 
Gordon Freeman
Gordon Freeman
Professor, Department of Medical Oncology, Professor of Medicine
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University
 
About Speaker:

Gordon J. Freeman, PhD works in the Department of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Freeman earned his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and PhD in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from Harvard University.  His research has identified the major pathways that control the immune response by inhibiting T cell activation (PD-1/PD-L1 and B7-2/CTLA-4) or stimulating T cell activation (B7-2/CD28).

In 2000, Dr. Freeman discovered PD-L1 and PD-L2, and showed they were ligands for PD-1, thus defining the PD-1 pathway and the drug target: block the interaction.  He showed the function of PD-1 was to inhibit immune responses and that blockade enhanced immune responses. He showed that PD-L1 is highly expressed on many solid tumors such as breast and lung, as well as some hematologic malignancies and allows these tumors to inhibit immune attack.  He received the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology and 2017 Warren Alpert Foundation award for this work that led to development of PD-1 pathway blockade for cancer immunotherapy.

Michael Karin
Michael Karin
Distinguished Professor, Department of Pharmacology
University of California, San Diego
 
Michael Karin
Michael Karin
Distinguished Professor, Department of Pharmacology
University of California, San Diego
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Karin was born in Tel Aviv, Israel and received the Bachelor of Science degree in 1975 from Tel Aviv University, with a major in Biology. In 1975 he arrived in the US and in 1979 received a Ph.D. degree in Molecular Biology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Karin followed his graduate studies with postdoctoral fellowships at the Fox Chase Institute for Cancer Research, working in the laboratory of Dr. Beatrice Mintz, and the laboratory of Dr. John Baxter at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Karin joined the faculty at the University of California, San Diego in 1986, where currently he is a Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology.

Dr. Karin has received numerous awards including the Oppenheimer Award for Excellence in Research from the Endocrine Society in 1990, an American Cancer Society Research Professorship in 1999, the C.E.R.I.E.S. Research Award for Physiology or Biology of the Skin in 2000, the Harvey Prize in Human Health in 2011, the Brupbacher Prize in Cancer Research in 2013 and the William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Basic and Tumor Immunology in 2013. Dr. Karin was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2005, as a Foreign Associate of EMBO in 2007, and to the Institute of Medicine in 2011. Dr. Karin also serves on several advisory boards and was cofounder of Signal Pharmaceuticals (currently Celgene).

Moderator
Rachel  Caspi
Rachel Caspi
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
NEI, NIH
 
Rachel  Caspi
Rachel Caspi
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
NEI, NIH
 
About Speaker:

Dr. Caspi is is a tenured senior investigator, Section Head and Chief of the Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, NIH. She also holds an Adjunct Professorship at the University of Pennsylvannia Sch. Med. Dr. Caspi's research centers on immunology of the eye. A major direction is tolerance and autoimmunity to immunologically privileged retinal antigens in animal models of autoimmune uveitis, a potentially blinding human disease. She developed the mouse model of autoimmune uveitis, now in use worldwide. Her studies have elucidated many basic mechanisms of pathogenesis and helped to devise clinically relevant immunotherapeutic approaches. Her recent work emphasizes the Th17 response and the effects of the commensal microbiome on anti-retinal autoimmunity as well as on mucosal immunity and host defense at the ocular surface. She serves on journal Editorial Boards and is an organizer of ocular and general immunology conferences. Dr. Caspi is the recipient of the highly prestigious Friedenwald award and the Alcon Research Institute award, and has authored and co-authored over 240 publications.

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3:30
Conference Concludes
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Day 3 - Wednesday, March 28, 2018
 
Immunotherapeutics & Immunomonitoring 2018
Round Table Session

12:40
Round Table 2: Overcoming Commercialization Challenges in Biomarker Development
 
John Schilling
John Schilling
Director & Advisor of Diagnostics
Eli Lilly
About Speaker: John Schilling, MBA, is a seventeen-year employee of Eli Lilly & Co., who currently is Director – Advisor of Diagnostics for the Personalized Medicine - Tailored Therapeutics Division within Lilly Research Laboratories.   John is responsible ... Read Full Bio 
 
 
John Schilling
John Schilling
Director & Advisor of Diagnostics
Eli Lilly
 
About Speaker:

John Schilling, MBA, is a seventeen-year employee of Eli Lilly & Co., who currently is Director – Advisor of Diagnostics for the Personalized Medicine - Tailored Therapeutics Division within Lilly Research Laboratories.   John is responsible for executing the global diagnostic personalized medicine strategy to enable the capabilities to deliver for the global drug teams across Lilly’s pharmaceutical business units.  John’s prior responsibilities at Lilly have been as Global Marketing Director for the global Forteo and Evista brands.

Prior to Eli Lilly, John has worked as Marketing Director for Bausch & Lomb’s pharmaceutical division representing the anti-allergy and dry eye products.  He also was U.S. Brand Manager for AstraZeneca’s Prilosec brand.  Prior to John’s pharmaceutical experience, he worked in the diagnostic industry for Abbott Laboratories Diagnostics Division, Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur, Bayer Diagnostics and Centocor in different sales, sales management, global marketing and business development roles.