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ImmunoTX Summit

2017-11-182017-12-162017-10-31
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MENTORS
Scott Durum

Scott Durum
Chief, Section of Cytokines and Immunity
NIH - National Cancer Center - Center for Cancer Research
Scott Durum
Chief, Section of Cytokines and Immunity
NIH - National Cancer Center - Center for Cancer Research
 
About Mentor:

Scott Durum trained in immunology at Wake Forest, Oak Ridge, National Jewish and Yale before coming to the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. His lab has been interested in the IL-7 pathway for a number of years. Recently, together with collaborators, they found that this is a major pathway driving Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, the most common cancer in children. They are working to develop therapeutics directed against the IL-7 pathway in this disease.

Gordon Freeman

Gordon Freeman
Professor, Department of Medical Oncology, Professor of Medicine
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University
Gordon Freeman
Professor, Department of Medical Oncology, Professor of Medicine
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University
 
About Mentor:

Gordon J. Freeman, PhD works in the Department of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Freeman earned his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and PhD in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from Harvard University.  His research has identified the major pathways that control the immune response by inhibiting T cell activation (PD-1/PD-L1 and B7-2/CTLA-4) or stimulating T cell activation (B7-2/CD28).

In 2000, Dr. Freeman discovered PD-L1 and PD-L2, and showed they were ligands for PD-1, thus defining the PD-1 pathway and the drug target: block the interaction.  He showed the function of PD-1 was to inhibit immune responses and that blockade enhanced immune responses. He showed that PD-L1 is highly expressed on many solid tumors such as breast and lung, as well as some hematologic malignancies and allows these tumors to inhibit immune attack.  He received the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology and 2017 Warren Alpert Foundation award for this work that led to development of PD-1 pathway blockade for cancer immunotherapy.

Alison Humbles

Alison Humbles
Principal Scientist
MedImmune
Alison Humbles
Principal Scientist
MedImmune
 
About Mentor:
Cathryn Nagler

Cathryn Nagler
Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
The University of Chicago
Cathryn Nagler
Bunning Food Allergy Professor, Professor of Pathology, Medicine, Pediatrics and the College
The University of Chicago
 
About Mentor:

Cathryn Nagler graduated with honors from Barnard College, Columbia University. She obtained her Ph.D. from the Sackler Institute of Biomedical Science at N.Y.U. School of Medicine and did a postdoctoral fellowship at M.I.T. She was Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology) at Harvard Medical School prior to joining the University of Chicago in 2009. She received the inaugural Bunning Food Allergy Professorship in 2011. Dr. Nagler has participated in numerous review panels for the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, NIDDK, NIAID, and Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE). She recently began her second term on FARE’s research advisory board. She has served the American Association of Immunologists (AAI) as Section Editor for the Journal of Immunology, Instructor (Mucosal Immunology) for the Introduction to Immunology course and as member of the Program, Clinical Immunology, Publications and Awards Committees. She is the senior editor for Clinical and Translational Immunology for the AAI’s new journal ImmunoHorizons. She has also served as an elected Councilor of the Society for Mucosal Immunology and is an Associate Editor of the journal Mucosal Immunology. Dr. Nagler has a long-standing interest in the mechanisms governing tolerance to dietary antigens and the potential immunomodulatory features of the oral route of antigen administration. Her most recent work examines how commensal bacteria regulate susceptibility to allergic responses to food. She has applied insights gained from studying pre-clinical gnotobiotic murine models of cow’s milk allergy to launch a new company, ClostraBio, which is developing microbiome-modulating therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of food allergy.

Joost Oppenheim

Joost Oppenheim
Senior Investigator
NIH NCI
Joost Oppenheim
Senior Investigator
NIH NCI
 
About Mentor:

Dr. Oppenheim pioneered the development of cytokine, chemokine and alarmin fields of research. He is currently studying the role of alarmins that activate toll-like receptors, in inducing immunity to cancer. He has been engaged in translational studies aimed at utilizing alarmins as adjuvants in vaccines for use against infectious agents and tumors. He is also investigating means of blocking the immunosuppressive limb of immunity as exerted by T regulatory cells to augment antitumor immunity. Dr. Oppenheim is the Chief of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation and the Deputy Director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program at the National Cancer Institute which focuses on the effects of inflammation and the immune response on cancer.

Jennifer Towne

Jennifer Towne
Senior Scientific Director
Janssen
Jennifer Towne
Senior Scientific Director
Janssen
 
About Mentor: